Frederick VI

Frederick VI,

1768–1839, king of Denmark (1808–39) and Norway (1808–14), son and successor of Christian VIIChristian VII,
1749–1808, king of Denmark and Norway (1766–1808), son and successor of Frederick V. Shortly after his accession his mental illness made him dependent on his physician, Struensee, who in 1770 caused the dismissal of minister of foreign affairs Johann
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. After the court party had executed Struensee, expelled Frederick's mother, Caroline Matilda, and imposed their will on the demented Christian (1772), Frederick grew up under the guardianship of the dowager queen. In 1784 by a peaceful coup he established himself as regent. He made Andreas Peter BernstorffBernstorff, Andreas Peter
, 1735–97, Danish politician; nephew of Johann Hartwig Ernst Bernstorff. Made (1773) foreign minister after Struensee's fall from power, he obtained from Russia the final ratification of the exchange treaty negotiated by his uncle in 1767.
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 minister, and liberal reforms were instituted. Except for a short war with Sweden (1788), peace reigned in a prosperous Denmark until the close of the century. Denmark clung to its neutrality in the French Revolutionary Wars, but its opposition to the British ruling on neutral shipping resulted in an English attack on the Danish fleet (see Copenhagen, battle ofCopenhagen, battle of,
1801, an important incident of the French Revolutionary Wars. In Dec., 1800, Denmark joined Russia, Sweden, and Prussia in declaring the armed neutrality of the northern powers in the French Revolutionary Wars and in announcing that they would not comply
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, 1801). Again, in 1807, England attacked neutral DenmarkDenmark
, Dan. Danmark, officially Kingdom of Denmark, kingdom (2015 est. pop. 5,689,000), 16,629 sq mi (43,069 sq km), N Europe. It borders on Germany in the south, the North Sea in the west, the Skagerrak in the north, and the Kattegat and the Øresund in the east.
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 and bombarded CopenhagenCopenhagen, battle of,
1801, an important incident of the French Revolutionary Wars. In Dec., 1800, Denmark joined Russia, Sweden, and Prussia in declaring the armed neutrality of the northern powers in the French Revolutionary Wars and in announcing that they would not comply
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. Frederick thereupon allied himself with Napoleon I and was punished at the Congress of Vienna (1814–15) by the loss of Norway to Sweden. As compensation he received the island of Rügen and Swedish Pomerania, which he exchanged with Prussia for the duchy of Lauenburg. Frederick had no male issue; his cousin Christian VIII succeeded him.
References in periodicals archive ?
1808Danish crown prince Frederick VI ascends the throne following the death of his father Christian VII.
Relations with Caroline Mathilde deteriorate after she produces a male heir, Frederick VI and the Queen seeks emotional comfort in the arms of the King's personal physician, Johann Friedrich Struensee (Mads Mikkelsen), who shares her political leanings.
When their father died in June 1914 Fred faced a double nightmare, having to ascend the throne as Adolphus Frederick VI and make war on England, which be loved.
One pre pared for King Frederick VI of Denmark, discovered only very recently by Gertsch himself, actually records some entries in Beethoven's hand, most notably affecting the long-disputed scoring of the opening phrase of the "Et incarnatus est." After the preparation of these copies (though perhaps before the Danish copy), Beethoven ordered the preparation of a Stichvorlage, a score in the hand of several copyists and (like the Arbeitshopie) copiously annotated by Beethoven; it was sent off to the publisher B.
The prize, instituted in 1831 by the Danish king Frederick VI, was for all discoveries of new telescopic comets.
In the early 19th century King Frederick VI of Denmark livened up the game by striking a gold medal for each discoverer, instituting the practice of naming comets after the first person to see them.