market economy

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market economy

an economic system in which production and allocation are determined mainly by decisions in competitive markets, rather than controlled by the STATE.
References in periodicals archive ?
Two issues might cloud a healthy relationship between states and corporations: the very nature of the relationship and deviation from free market economy principles, especially freedom to choose.
Those protagonists who favoured so-called light touch regulation, meaning no control at all, accompanied by the sell-off of state owned industries, who believed that their free market economy would benefit all, should reflect upon the consequences.
Al Jazeera's Lucia Newman, reporting from Santiago, explains that Chile's free market economy was one factor that helped it gain entry into the OECD.
The general assumption is that free market economy is a necessary precondition for the national and international competitiveness.
Despite the anti-Western sentiment noted by Thornhill, Russians continue to link some elements of traditional democratic values -- namely a free market economy and democratic governance -- with Western-style democracy.
Herbert Stepic, chief executive of Raiffeisen International, which has spearheaded the nine-member initiative, said, 'We fought for 50 years, many of us, to get these countries away from communism and now we have a free market economy in the region, we can't leave them alone when there is an extremely harsh wind blowing.
George Bush insists on advocating the Republican Conservative fallacy of a free market economy as solution to society's ills.
Can a free market economy truly thrive in a non-democratic state?
Getting a "good deal" is a fundamental part of a free market economy and the badge of being an astute businessperson.
As long as the field can manage to survive in a growing free market economy, the future looks bright for Czech dance.
Such production takes place in a more or less free market economy because of its efficiency to coordinate demand and supply as well as ability to stabilize the economy.
By telling many small stories, the authors describe how the big story played out: the USA became a superpower in a relatively short time, built in part by a free market economy and rapid assimilation of new technologies, increasing freedom for many who had not thought they could get it even while they struggled for it to the point of death, and the accumulation of power, whether economic, social, political, or spiritual.