free software movement

(redirected from Free software philosophy)

free software movement

The initiative endorsed by the Free Software Foundation that promotes freedom for computer users and considers proprietary software unethical. It holds that all software users are morally entitled to the freedoms granted by "free" software, which is often free of charge, but mostly free of restrictions (see free software). The first and main achievement of the free software movement was the GNU operating system. However, due to restrictions with application programs and embedded codes in hardware, the goal has yet to be fully realized. See free software, GNU, Free Software Foundation and GNU/Linux.
References in periodicals archive ?
While he is rightly concerned about the predatory pay-to-publish journal industry and its associated high-priced services as well as the corruptibility of using impact algorithms, he conflates what is essentially a for-profit publication scheme with peer reviewed publications that adhere to a free software philosophy. He also misrepresents copyleft licensing as a whole, giving authors the impression that they sign away their "intellectual property" rights to open source journals.
Instead, their stated reasons for moving away from the free software philosophy are presented in the form of 'cash[ing] in on the rising tide of the Internet economy by turning the creation of free software into something that made more sense to investors, venture capitalists, and the stock-buying public' (Kelty, 2008: Loc.

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