free-space loss

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free-space loss

[′frē ‚spās ‚lȯs]
(electromagnetism)
The theoretical radiation loss, depending only on frequency and distance, that would occur if all variable factors were disregarded when transmitting energy between two antennas.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
The close-in (CI) free-space path loss model is a well-known path loss model [45].
In LOS V-V, [alpha] values can vary compared with the free-space path losses, at 4.5 GHz it was 41.4 dB compared to the 45.5 dB theoretical FSPL at 1 m, at 28 GHz it was 60.1 dB compared to the 61.4 dB theoretical FSPL at 1 m, and it was 82.5 dB compared to the 64.0 dB theoretical FSPL at 1 m at the 38 GHz band.
When d < [d.sub.0], the free-space path loss model is adopted.
For example, since the free-space path loss at mm-wave frequency is inversely proportional to the carrier frequency, the power losses are much more effective than at low frequencies.
In this paper, the free-space path loss model based on FRIIS equation is introduced to solve such an issue [17].
The show's curator, Fredrik Liew, speaks of her sculptures as words that become elements in a vocabulary, while in a catalogue essay for another recent solo show, "Free-Space Path Loss" at Lunds Konsthall, Chris Sharp refers to Canell's works as metaphors.
Free-space path loss is the loss in signal strength that results from a line-of-sight path through free space.
Free-space path loss is the loss in signal strength that results from a line-of-sight path through free space, does not include the gain of the antennas used at the transmitter and receiver, is proportional to the square of the distance between the transmitter and receiver, and also proportional to the square of Iridium operational frequency.
The physical interpretation of n =1 is a guided wave in one plane, n = 2corresponds to a free-space path loss, and n = 4 corresponds to a situation, where low antenna heights cause the first Fresnel zone to be obstructed [15].
As a reference, free-space path loss models are also included.
Where n = 2, we have a classic free-space path loss model; where n < 2 - we have the so-called waveguide effect (signal amplification); where n > 2 we have signal propagation under NLOS conditions or in the presence of other strong effects (e.g., diffraction, refraction, etc.).