FreeBSD

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FreeBSD

(operating system)
A free operating system based on the BSD 4.4-lite release from Computer Systems Research Group at the University of California at Berkeley.

FreeBSD requires an ISA, EISA, VESA, or PCI based computer with an Intel 80386SX to Pentium CPU (or compatible AMD or Cyrix CPU) with 4 megabytes of RAM and 60MB of disk space.

Some of FreeBSD's features are: preemptive multitasking with dynamic priority adjustment to ensure smooth and fair sharing of the computer between applications and users. Multiuser access - peripherals such as printers and tape drives can be shared between all users. Complete TCP/IP networking including SLIP, PPP, NFS and NIS. Memory protection, demand-paged virtual memory with a merged VM/buffer cache design. FreeBSD was designed as a 32 bit operating system. X Window System (X11R6) provides a graphical user interface. Binary compatibility with many programs built for SCO, BSDI, NetBSD, 386BSD, and Linux. Hundreds of ready-to-run applications in the FreeBSD ports collection. FreeBSD is source code compatible with most popular commercial Unix systems and thus most applications require few, if any, changes to compile. Shared libraries. A full compliment of C, C++, Fortran and Perl development tools and many other languages. Source code for the entire system is available. Extensive on-line documentation.

http://freebsd.org/.

ftp://ftp.freebsd.org/pub/FreeBSD or try your nearest mirror site listed at the home site or buy the CD-ROM from Walnut Creek.
This article is provided by FOLDOC - Free Online Dictionary of Computing (foldoc.org)

BSD

(Berkeley Software Distribution) The software distribution facility of the Computer Systems Research Group (CSRG) of the University of California at Berkeley. CSRG helped develop the TCP/IP protocols for DARPA and the ARPAnet and released them in the early 1980s along with the Unix source code from AT&T. BSD charged for the media, and a license from AT&T was required for use. Throughout the 1980s, this operating system release from BSD was known as "BSD Unix."

Bill Joy ran the group until 1982 when he co-founded Sun Microsystems, bringing 4.2BSD with him as the foundation of SunOS. The last BSD version released by BSD was 4.4BSD.

Many Offshoots
In the 1990s, the AT&T kernel was removed from the BSD release, and several different groups developed new kernels to replace the AT&T code.

BSD/386 and BSD/OS
In 1991, former CSRG members founded Berkeley Software Design, Inc., Colorado Springs, CO, and released BSD/386 for the Intel platform. A decade later, Wind River Systems (www.windriver.com) acquired BSDI's software assets and turned the OS into its BSD/OS Internet Server product.

FreeBSD, NetBSD and OpenBSD
Out of all open source BSD operating systems, FreeBSD (www.freebsd.org) is the most widely used. It runs on Intel and Alpha platforms and is known for its ease of use. NetBSD (www.netbsd.org) runs on the greatest number of platforms, and OpenBSD (www.openbsd.org) is the most security-oriented. OpenBSD evolved from NetBSD and also runs on a variety of hardware. A long-established BSD support site can be found at www.daemonnews.org.
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References in periodicals archive ?
In below ruleset, the rule numbers 110 and 220 were passing bidirectional traffic (through pipe no 10 and 11) to the host xyz.it, these rules were configured in FreeBSD kernel
QES leverages the extensive native functionality of the ZFS file system and the FreeBSD kernel to ensure persistent, reliable storage management, protection against data corruption, seamless capacity expansion, and flexible storage pool management.
In the previous Debian 6 release, the distribution added the option of using a FreeBSD kernel (i386 or amd64) with the Debain software collection, and in the next version they intend to provide similar support for the GNU Hurd kernel.
The FreeBSD kernel, like most current OSes, uses the 8253 timer chip to drive its timing facilities.
We also implemented soft timers in the FreeBSD kernel. Trigger states were added in the obvious places described in Section 3.