freezing-point depression

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freezing-point depression

[′frēz·iŋ ‚pȯint di‚presh·ən]
(physical chemistry)
The lowering of the freezing point of a solution compared to the pure solvent; the depression is proportional to the active mass of the solute in a given amount of solvent.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
(1,2) In clinical osmometry, the freezing point depression method is more routinely used, because it is more precise and more accurate than the vapor pressure depression method.
A balanced freezing point depression is even more critical in low-fat frozen desserts.
We believe this interval is inappropriately low, based on our duplicate measurements of serum osmolality by freezing point depression (Advanced Instruments Model 3MO osmometer) in 59 healthy volunteers of ages 20-60 years.
(It should be noted that freezing point depression and boiling point elevation experiments always have relatively large errors because results are dependent upon the accurate measurement of small temperature changes.)
Determination of Concentrations by Freezing Point Depression Experiments
We are an authority on the application Freezing Point Depression technology for measuring the osmolality of solutions.
It has particular benefits for ice cream manufacturers where difficulties in balancing sweetness, freezing point depression and texture can be overcome through the use of C*-Bio-Sweet.
Many of its physical properties, including viscosity, solubility, boiling point elevation and freezing point depression, are similar to sucrose.
Osmolality (# of moles of solute in a kg of water) can be measured by freezing point depression or by vapor pressure osmometers, (5) but also can be estimated provided that some basic chemistries are available (i.e., Na, Glue, BUN), and can be performed at the patient's bedside (OSMO, CALC = 2 Na + Glucose/18 + BUN/2.8).
Hardness and freezing point and also the freezing point depression factor kept within the usual limits, so that no particular detriment to melting characteristics need be expected.