Cameroun

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Cameroun

 

a volcanic massif (mountain mass) in Africa, by the shores of the Gulf of Guinea. Elevation, 4, 070 m. It is a trachybasaltic stratovolcano, with a dome-shaped form, gentleslopes, and numerous lateral cones and craters. The main peak is the active cone Fako, which last erupted in 1959. The greatest amount of precipitation in Africa (approximately 10, 000 mm a year) falls on the western and southwestern slopes of the Cameroun massif. There are equatorial rainforests (partially replaced by plantations) along the lower sections of the slopes. There are mountain forests higher up and mountain meadows in the highest zone.

References in periodicals archive ?
In addition, Terretta focuses so exclusively on French Cameroon that it appears to be conflated with the entire Cameroonian state.
What was more pressing was the security situation in West Cameroon on the eve of reunification with French Cameroon and also at a time when Nigeria was scheduled to gain independence by 1st October, 1960.
This might be explained by the fact that before the reunification, the Gendarmerie in French Cameroon was used to maintain law and order.
Where French Cameroon immigrants are mentioned, the researchers limit themselves to the role played by these immigrants in the reunification process.
As indicated above, it may appear a paradox that immigrant populations escaping from inadequate economic opportunities and political persecutions in French Cameroon had to work for the reunification of their host territory and their home of origin.
Gibbons even declared in 1951 that "much of the drive behind the movement will disappear once N N Mbile (the prominent British Cameroon leader of the movement) has secured election to the House of Assembly and begins to turn his attention to more practical issues" (NAB) file vb/b (1951)1:7) However, what threatened the British authorities was the militancy of French Cameroon immigrants on this issue.
There are numerous instances where certain envious and improvident individuals sought and are still seeking to bring about, by subtle means, the eviction of industrious persons of French Cameroon origin who have developed excellent farms in their areas (NAB, si(1951)3, FCWU)
According to Robert Kum Dibongue, farmers from French Cameroon were subjected to a merciless and unremitting fleecing by the landlord in Kumba Division.
Worse-still, upon the return of these workers from French Cameroon they were given no concession regarding reducing or easing custom duties on their personal belongings.
In fact, smuggling was a sign of protest and resistance to the obnoxious Anglo-French frontier and many French Cameroon smugglers died in water or in "bushes" as they struggled to escape custom harassments.
Fundamental differences between French Cameroon, with its colonial background of assimilation, civil law and a unitary system, and Southern Cameroon with its Westminster-style parliament and common law system, have led to conflicting views.
The Anglophones are also not happy about three events: the imposition of one-party rule in 1966; the suspension of the federal constitution by former President Ahmadou Ahidjo, followed by the 1972 introduction of a unitary constitution through a stagemanaged referendum; and the 1984 renaming of the country as La Republique du Cameroun -- the name of French Cameroon before unification.