Cameroun

(redirected from French Cameroon)
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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Cameroun

 

a volcanic massif (mountain mass) in Africa, by the shores of the Gulf of Guinea. Elevation, 4, 070 m. It is a trachybasaltic stratovolcano, with a dome-shaped form, gentleslopes, and numerous lateral cones and craters. The main peak is the active cone Fako, which last erupted in 1959. The greatest amount of precipitation in Africa (approximately 10, 000 mm a year) falls on the western and southwestern slopes of the Cameroun massif. There are equatorial rainforests (partially replaced by plantations) along the lower sections of the slopes. There are mountain forests higher up and mountain meadows in the highest zone.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the 1980s, in an attempt to manage the language differences in the official print media, the French Cameroon Tribune was published five times a week, while the English version was published once a week.
The book is also unique because it is arguably the first historical account of French Cameroon's nationalist movements and thus lays the foundation for a much-needed historiographical interrogation of French Cameroon's late colonial and early post-independence history.
When French Cameroon gained its independence on 1 January 1960 without a constitution (p.
What was more pressing was the security situation in West Cameroon on the eve of reunification with French Cameroon and also at a time when Nigeria was scheduled to gain independence by 1st October, 1960.
The president's sincerity in the national reconciliation and healing efforts was evidenced in his organisation of an official funeral for the late Winston Ndeh Ntumazah, a prominent Anglophone founding leader of the opposition Union des Populations du Cameroun (UPC), who participated in the February 1959 UN debate on French Cameroon's independence and lived in exile for over 30 years in Ghana, Guinea, Egypt, and the UK.
An important stage of the mass mobilisation programme came in the form of the 44th edition of the Youth Day Celebrations on 11 February, which incidentally is the date commemorating the plebiscite in which the British Southern Cameroons voted en masse to re-unite with the French Cameroons. In acknowledgement of the role of the youth in the independence and reunification movements, the theme for the 2010 edition was "Youth and the Consolidation of 50 Years of Independence and Reunification".
Where French Cameroon immigrants are mentioned, the researchers limit themselves to the role played by these immigrants in the reunification process.
As indicated above, it may appear a paradox that immigrant populations escaping from inadequate economic opportunities and political persecutions in French Cameroon had to work for the reunification of their host territory and their home of origin.
"Unity means loving and sharing with one another, but ever since the Southern Cameroon joined French Cameroon, all development investments have only benefitted French Cameroon," said Sylvanus Keti, an insurance broker.
Fundamental differences between French Cameroon, with its colonial background of assimilation, civil law and a unitary system, and Southern Cameroon with its Westminster-style parliament and common law system, have led to conflicting views.
Kamerun (as it was known at the time) became a League of Nations Mandate Territory and was split into French Cameroons and British Cameroons in 1919.
In her mid-twenties, Sally Chilver first came into contact with the French Cameroons when she was recruited to a new section of the War Cabinet Office dealing with the strategic overview of trade with the overseas territories of France and Belgium.