French Canadian


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French Canadian

1. a Canadian citizen whose native language is French
2. of or relating to French Canadians or their language
References in periodicals archive ?
They were isolated on wilderness tracts, separated from urban French Canadian communities and Church support.
His invocation to "return to the plow" aligns directly with the anti-modernization campaign for "colonization" led by many prominent clerics who exhorted young French Canadians to clear land for farming further and further into the woods.
In Section II we review the discrimination literature in the NHL, mostly of the French Canadian variety.
Even though for centuries there has been some misunderstanding between English Canadians and French Canadians (since the 1760s when the British acquired Canada from the French), it was only in the latter part of the twentieth century that the idea of separation by French Canada came to a head.
Individuals who self-identified as being Franco-American or French Canadian, or who reported one or more grandparents of French Canadian background, were eligible for the study except as noted below.
And while that goal has been achieved, it is thanks exclusively to a boom in French Canadian cinema, which takes 25% of the Quebec box office.
Instances such as the Battle of Long Sault in 1660, in which Dollard Des Ormeaux and his 16 companions were overcome by Iroquois, continue to live in French Canadian annals and in history textbooks read by generations of Canadian children.
And then there is the site of French Canadian artist Francois Dallegret at www.arteria.ca.
While the Mandan had seen whites--mostly French Canadian and British fur traders--York was the only black they had ever set eyes upon.
Will Durant was born in North Adams, Massachusetts, to French Canadian parents.
While some French Canadian men and women responded to these challenges by consciously and deliberately adopting lifestyles that they perceived to be more "American" than their previous ways of life, (3) many worked hard to maintain, at least on the most basic level, their premigration understandings of men's and women's proper places in family and society: man's authority in the family came through his responsibility of providing for his wife and children, while woman's place was in the home as wife and mother.
The guide for the Lewis and Clark expedition was a French Canadian who had already explored what was later called the Oregon territory.