French Canadian

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French Canadian

1. a Canadian citizen whose native language is French
2. of or relating to French Canadians or their language
References in periodicals archive ?
Silver, The French Canadian Idea of Confederation, 1864-1900 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1982), for more on French Canadians' hopes for--and frustrations with--their relationship with English-speaking Canadians in the late nineteenth century.
I had a French Canadian for a boss and it fucking killed me
He experienced all the events of a Catholic childhood, and in his case these experiences were cast in French Canadian terms.
Thus, the oldest French Canadians in our study were clearly the most traditional in terms of spousal relationships.
Bourassa's protest was ultimately in vain, but the schools debate revealed the intimate connection between the status of French Canadians outside Quebec, the national question within Quebec, and the idea that Canada was a multinational country respectful of minorities.
This article provides for the first time relevant data that allows a detailed comparison of housing types, values, tenure and occupations of French Canadians, English Canadians and immigrants from Southern and Eastern Europe, and for the cities of Montreal, Lachine, Outremont, Verdun and Westmount, between 1921 and 1951.
However, two distinct ethnic communities emerged and, thirty years later, 669 Scots and 1,107 French Canadians lived there.
22 march on the headquarters of the Sun-Sentina newspaper, the editor of XS remains unapologetic and French Canadians, according to an executive with the Hollywood, Fla.
Woonsocket was, after all, a minor mill town; its primary product, wool worsted, was not a great industry; its work force, dominated by French Canadians, was quite unlike that of most major industrial centeres; and its primary labor union, the Independent Textile Union, never affiliated with the major federations.
Garneau's work was hailed as the "national Bible" of the French Canadians, and its influence, both literary and political, was considerable and lasting.
Working-Class Americanism: The Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 1914-1960 During the 1930s in Woonsocket, Rhode Island, conservative, deeply religious French Canadians joined with Franco-Belgian immigrants steeped in Marxian socialism to build "the most powerful of New England's textile unions" (p.