French Canadian

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French Canadian

1. a Canadian citizen whose native language is French
2. of or relating to French Canadians or their language
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Perceptions of French Canadians' geographical destiny matter not merely on account of the scale of emigration.
(21) The discourses that formed about French Canadians in Northeastern logging camps were distinctly rural, however, and therefore have not been the target of historical investigation to the same extent as urban discourses on race and industry have been.
His invocation to "return to the plow" aligns directly with the anti-modernization campaign for "colonization" led by many prominent clerics who exhorted young French Canadians to clear land for farming further and further into the woods.
Settlers Green Outlet Village in North Conway has experienced the benefits of catering to French Canadian tourists, says Dot Seybold, general manager of OVP Management, which manages the shopping mall.
2, Fall 2005 contained sixty-four pages of text that included ten UELAC projects; "The Murder of a Loyalist' by Kimberly Hurst UE, sixth great-granddaughter of Bartholomew London UE; "The 78th Fraser Highlanders Regiment" by Robert Collins McBride UE; "2006 Fall Loyalist Mohawk Valley Trip" by George Anderson UE and Ed Kipp UE; "Jeremiah French: Loyalist, Soldier, Farmer" by Shaun Wallace UE; "The Partnership That Created Canada: The Place of the Loyalists and French Canadians in North American History" by Professor Hereward Senior Ph.D, UELAC Honorary Vice-President; and "Suffering Everything but Death: A biography of John Stevens Senior UE--Part Two" by Robert Collins McBride UE.
It is worth noting that a number of cells concerning French Canadians have low frequencies.
Even though for centuries there has been some misunderstanding between English Canadians and French Canadians (since the 1760s when the British acquired Canada from the French), it was only in the latter part of the twentieth century that the idea of separation by French Canada came to a head.
Delisle said historically there were needs for churches that served ethnic populations of French Canadians, Irish, Italians, Polish and Portuguese, among others.
The assessment of the risk for TSD among individuals of French Canadian background in the New England states is an important health issue because up to 10.3% of the residents of these states declared French Canadian heritage in the 2000 census and a much larger proportion reported French ancestry (25); the latter, in turn, almost certainly relates to the heavy migration of French Canadians to the New England states (26).
The often-uneasy relationship between French and English Canadians has been a feature of our national life from the 1840s, when the infamous Durham Report suggested that the greatest kindness to French Canadians would be to gradually eliminate their language and culture.
When French Canadians migrated from Quebec to New England in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, many of them moved from rural agricultural economies into industrialized urban settings for the first time.
He's pretty much the least French of the French Canadians. What do you think of the French Canadians trying to separate themselves from Canada?