Huguenot

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Huguenot

1. a French Calvinist, esp of the 16th or 17th centuries
2. designating the French Protestant Church
References in periodicals archive ?
Though born and bred in Britain, all three of these men were the sons of French Huguenots whose families had come to Britain seeking refuge from religious persecution in their home country.
This volume brings together an international group of scholars to investigate the religious culture of French Huguenots who settled in the British Isles from the time of the Restoration in 1660 to the middle of the eighteenth century.
The forced re-Catholicization and expulsion of French Huguenots from their homes presented a seemingly clear picture of a Catholic monarch's perspective on upholding former laws which protected Protestant worship.
Over the next several months, thousands of Huguenots were slain in Paris, and similar massacres took place in other towns, with an estimated death toll of 100,000 and the exodus of hundreds of thousands of French Huguenots abroad.
An example can be found in the contrast of receptions given to the French Huguenots and their hapless coreligionists the German Protestant Palatines.
From the July 2002 Socinianism and Cultural Exchange symposium, held in Munich, 11 papers highlight the relationship of anti- Trinitarianism to liberal currents in reformed Protestantism, namely Dutch Remonstrants, some of the French Huguenots, and English Latitudinarians.
For more than sixty years, the infamous philosophe preached religious toleration in a society where Protestant worship could send a man or woman to prison for life; his highly publicized defense of French Huguenots brought his name back into prominence years after his plays ceased to attract large audiences.
Down the years we have had French Huguenots, Jews, White Russians, Poles, all fleeing some kind of persecution.
Benedict has also analyzed probate inventories to see what books and paintings French Huguenots owned in the city of Metz.
The suffering of the Roman Catholic Church during the Reign of Terror does not begin to compare to the suffering which it imposed on French Huguenots (Protestants) during the preceding 250 years.
It was his disciple, Franz Karl Achard (1753-1821), the son of French Huguenots who had emigrated to Prussia, who would find, in 1799, an efficient process that could be applied on an industrial scale.
In the 17th century, French Huguenots brought Syrah from France to South Africa's Cape of Good Hope, where it was rechristened "Shiraz.