French Canadian

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French Canadian

1. a Canadian citizen whose native language is French
2. of or relating to French Canadians or their language
References in periodicals archive ?
The day's events will begin with a noon mass in the historic church, followed by an afternoon of French-Canadian and Native-American music, dancing, and food, as well as a heritage tent with cultural and historical exhibits.
Brault, The French-Canadian Heritage in New England (Hanover: University Press of New England, 1986), 52-53; Gary Gerstle, WorkingClass Americanism: the Politics of Labor in a Textile City, 1914-1960 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1989), 21; Bruno Ramirez and Yves Otis, Crossing the 49th Parallel: Migration from Canada to the United States, 1900-1930 (Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 2001), 1; Victor Bushey (b.
Until firmer patriarchal laws were stuffed into the reformed Civil Code of 1866 in Lower Canada, hundreds of French-Canadian women voted alongside men Noel's detailed account elevates female history to its rightful honour and leaves the masculinist myth of Canada's beginnings in the dust.
A third workshop took place in September and addressed the French-Canadian audience's impact on state tourism.
He noted that Ovila Case, a Gardner resident of French-Canadian descent, was the city's first casualty in World War I, and 833 soldiers of French-Canadian descent from Gardner served in World War II.
We found Asian-Canadian and French-Canadian children seemed to prefer interacting with kids of the same ethnic background," Nadine Girouard, a research associate in the Concordia Department of Psychology and member of the Centre for Research in Human Development (CRDH), said.
Gendered passages; French-Canadian immigration to Lowell, Massachusetts, 1900-1920.
From the former military man who resented being taught by a woman to the charming French-Canadian student who relies on Professor Jaggers to save his life and preserve his romantic outlook (the last, alas, doomed to disappointment), these are fully dimensional sketches of students who left an impression on this unusual humanities professor.
Despite being too long and a touch too personal, this French-Canadian movie took every award going on home turf last year.
Raised in the best tradition of French-Canadian Catholicism, he received a thorough Christian upbringing.
Some forty years later another British radical, Goldwyn Smith, a former Regius professor resident in Toronto, declared that the British Empire had "artificially preserved from absorption the French-Canadian element, an antediluvian relic of the old French society with all its torpor and bigotry.

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