Freshwater Sponges

The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Freshwater Sponges

 

a group of invertebrates of the order Cornacuspongida. There are as many as 28 genera of freshwater sponges. Particularly widespread are sponges of the family Spongillidae. Other important freshwater sponges are the Lubomirskiidae, Ochridospongia, and Potomolepidae. The last family is encountered in the freshwaters of Africa.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Other taxa ingested by fish examined include freshwater sponges (Porifera), crustaceans (Ostracoda and Decapoda), water mites (Acarina), and four worm phyla (Table 1).
Fossil freshwater sponges (Porifera: Spongillidae) from Western Canada: an overlooked group of quaternary paleoecological indicators.
Because the tubes were formed of fibrous materials, Barbour assumed Daemonelix were the roots of fossilized plants, perhaps the remains of giant freshwater sponges. Much of what became the Great Plains of the United States was once underwater, after all.
Species richness of freshwater sponges (Class Demospongiae) is greater in eastern than in western North America (Reiswig et al., 2010), which likely explains the paucity of information regarding freshwater sponge distribution and life-history information within the western gulf slope drainages of Louisiana, Texas, and New Mexico.
Little has been reported about the occurrence of freshwater sponges in Nebraska and no publications have previously recorded from central Nebraska waters.
These samples were examined for 1) freshwater sponges, which were identified to species, and 2) silicious spicules (gemmoscleres) of these sponges; details of the methods and results of this sampling have been published (6,7).
The filtration apparatus for food collection in freshwater sponges (Porifera, Spongillidae).
The distribution and taxonomy of freshwater sponges (Porifera: Spongillidae) in North America has not received widespread attention, although some notable works exist for the entire United States (Penney & Racek 1968), and regions surrounding the Great Lakes (Potts 1887; Smith 1921; Old 1931; Jewell 1935; Neidhoefer 1940; Eshleman 1950; Ricciardi & Reiswig 1993).
Living beneath overhangs of the reefs are aquatic mosses and freshwater sponges.
Fish and Wildlife Service noted the limitations of existing knowledge in its mid1970's review of freshwater sponges. In addition Watermolen (2008) noted conservationists have done little since that initial assessment to monitor or further evaluate the status of freshwater sponges.
Acute Conjunctivitis with Episcleritis and Anterior Uveitis Linked to Adiaspiromycosis and Freshwater Sponges, Amazon Region, Brazil, 2005