Fresnel diffraction


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Fresnel diffraction

[frā′nel di′frak·shən]
(optics)
Diffraction in which the source of light or the observing screen are at a finite distance from the aperture or obstacle.
References in periodicals archive ?
The effects of inhomogeneities with scales smaller than the Fresnel radius (Fresnel diffraction effects) cannot be correctly described within the GO model.
Among their topics are the design of diffractive optical elements, the analysis of diffractive optical elements in the Fresnel diffraction regimes, computer-generated holographic optical elements, and the fabrication of diffractive optical elements.
Among them, FFT[*] and [FFT.sup.-1] [*] are referred to Fourier transform and inverse Fourier transform, and [E.sub.prop] ([k.sub.x], [k.sub.y]) is the transfer function of the Fresnel diffraction. In the next section, it will be used to simulate the transmission of optical vortex in atmospheric turbulence.
Using (12) can simulate the Fresnel diffraction pattern field of a POV in free space propagation at different lengths.
The Huygens Fresnel diffraction equation is used to calculate the diffraction of water waves as they pass around the breakwaters.
Therefore, the only possibility to introduce Fresnel diffraction into the microwave reflector antenna market is to study other kinds of applications where parabolic reflectors can not be competitive.
Many papers based on the Rayleigh-Sommerfeld diffraction integral or on the Fresnel diffraction integral analyze the focusing properties of in-plane FZPs [7-10].
Topics discussed in the book include the foundations of scalar diffraction theory, digital Fourier transforms, simple computations using Fourier transforms, Fraunhofer diffraction and lenses, imaging systems and aberrations, Fresnel diffraction in vacuum, sampling requirements for Fresnel diffraction, relaxed sampling constraints with partial propagations, and propagation through atmospheric turbulence.
Although a relic of the early 19th century, the Fresnel diffraction integral (2) is still used today in its original form and has remained a most useful, reliable tool for diffraction calculations that have consistently yielded results which agree with experience and are well documented (2).
Observed within the distance of one wavelength (the near-field), however, there is no interference and the grating elements and apertures can be nearly perfectly imaged, except for slight "fringing" at the edges of the opening (known as Fresnel diffraction).
Qin, "Fine structure in fresnel diffraction patterns and its application in optical measurement," Opt.