Freudian slip


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Related to Freudian slip: Freudian theory

Freudian slip

any action, such as a slip of the tongue, that may reveal an unconscious thought

Freudian slip

[¦frȯid·ē·ən ′slip]
(psychology)
A verbal mistake that suggests some underlying motive, often sexual or aggressive in nature.
References in periodicals archive ?
Myleene It was not a Freudian slip. The Voice coach Tom Jones, 74, doing some serious backtracking after slating the talent on this year's BBC show.
While discussing the fight in the run-up to the event a colleague produced the most revealing Freudian slip by referring to Harrison as Ainsley.
I mean, pleasure to introduce..." Talk about a Freudian slip.
Major, unintended laugh comes from Blanchett's Freudian slip about her playwright spouse being a "lover of actors." Of all the participants, supporting player Anthony Weigh ("The Man Who Sued God") is the most eloquent, insightful and unpretentiously grounded about his thesping craft.
Perhaps in confusion, Freudian slip, or to intentionally mislead the American public, Cheney's statement, interpreted correctly, says "that's a valid reading of the way I do business."
'No, it was a Freudian slip. He revealed what he feels deep inside', he said.
Actually I'll rephrase that, she's exceedingly up for the production - wasn't a Freudian slip,' he laughed.
I suggest that this little statement of Kurzweil's is a Freudian slip of sorts, in which he is acknowledging that even in his hypothetical computopia many tragic imperfections will likely abound.
Garrison adds a range of current expressions to the hundreds already found in his Why You Say It and What's in a Word?, resulting in an assemblage that will get your rhetorical ducks in a row and probably save you from a Freudian slip or two.
In an arresting example of the psychological misfire commonly called a "Freudian slip," Rice once publicly referred to Mr.
IT WAS more a tactical error than a Freudian slip when Martin O'Neill apparently, jokingly, linked Fernando Ricksen with psychiatry.
Wente's observations-whether a Freudian slip or not--came in her final sentence, "But the bang it (the pill) made was bigger than the atom bomb."