friction torque

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friction torque

[′frik·shən ‚tȯrk]
(mechanics)
The torque which is produced by frictional forces and opposes rotational motion, such as that associated with journal or sleeve bearings in machines.
References in periodicals archive ?
Particularly at high rotating speeds, the frictional torque is reduced, leading to improved fuel efficiency of motorcycles.
With a unique bi-directional hydrodynamic lip feature, it has negligible frictional torque at high speeds.
By design, the system operates with lower contact area between rolling elements and bearing functional surfaces, thus lowering frictional torque, heat buildup, and wear.
In practice, slip ratio becomes larger than the characteristic ratio in the case of transferring a higher drive torque than the maximum frictional torque, i.e., [T.sub.w] > [[mu].sub.p][F.sub.z][r.sub.w] .
[beta] - Dynamic frictional torque constant (Nm x s x [rad.sup.-1])
For example, axial preload of bearings would affect the amplitude values and fluctuations of frictional torque (FT); bending directions and fixed points of cross-axis electrical cables would change the properties of cable spring torque (CST); static and dynamic balancing procedure would decide the magnitude of the unbalance torque (UT).
The frictional torque generated by the clutch during the slip or engagement of the clutch phase can be very important and generate a significant amount of heat may cause thermal cracks and deformation of the clutch disc, especially for the high motor vehicles.
Integrated bearings in hybrid technology lower the starting torque and frictional torque in operating speed in comparison to air bearing separator rollers known for their low friction.
Some seals last 10 times longer than others in lab testing, but better sealing typically increases drag and frictional torque, which can be undesirable in some applications.
Dutch firm Royal DSM has launched an innovative new high-performance material that reduces frictional torque in automobile engine timing systems.
The obvious solution was a stronger spring, but that increases decoupling effort and frictional torque, both of which are bad in a medical syringe pump.