Friedan


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Friedan

Betty. born 1921, US feminist, founder and first president (1966--70) of the National Organization for Women. Her books include The Feminine Mystique (1963), The Second Stage (1982), and The Fountain of Life (1993)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To understand how far we have come, a discussion of Friedan's research is essential.
It is important to recognise our appreciation for Friedan's contribution to feminist theory and real women's lives.
Paralelamente ao evento oficial, acontecia a Tribuna Internacional, da qual participavam organizacoes feministas "nao oficiais, algumas bastante radicais", como Betty Friedan. Nesta Tribuna, em "ambiente bem mais agitado", segundo a percepcao de Heloneida, estavam presentes Isabel Allende (chilena), e outras representantes de varias partes do mundo, varias delas descontentes com o aspecto formal da Conferencia e por nao terem recebido credenciais, como fez uma indiana, que, sacudindo sua sandalia bordada, disse: "Nesse sapato, a artesa faz tudo; o homem apenas prega a sola e ganha o dobro.
Any continuity between Friedan's account of postwar femininity and that offered by a daytime television programme might come as a surprise, given Friedan's famously scathing depiction of women's media and its glorification of domesticity.
Was it Betty Friedan who used the phrase "quiet desperation" to describe the lives of housewives?
The Feminine Mystique', Betty Friedan (50 Years): This book ask a woman to get away from the urban ennui and find life beyond her family and kids.
In this sense there are echoes of Betty Friedan's "problem that has no name." In The Feminine Mystique, that problem was aligned with the ennui and malcontent exclusively within the upper-middle-class white American community.
But in 1963, Betty Friedan published The Feminine Mystique, which explored the idea that many women were unhappy in the role of housewife.
There used to be a Women's Club, and it could attract a crowd of 50 to see the feminist icon Betty Friedan give a speech.
1921: Betty Friedan. Feminist, who famously described the home as "a comfortable concentration camp".
Jewish Women in Postwar America, is a collection of essays examining the lives of Jewish women in the United States in the 1950s and 1960s and considering how they did and did not conform to the cultural world described in Berty Friedan's foundational feminist work, The Feminine Mystique.