Friedman

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Friedman

Milton. born 1912. US economist, particularly associated with monetarism; a forceful advocate of free market capitalism
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
At first glance, it might appear to be a Friedmanite liquidity injection.
In the business ethics literature, Norman Bowie argues that there are "unenlightened" and "enlightened" Friedmanites. See Norman E.
Sir Keith Joseph spelled this out on several occasions, most authoritatively in his 1976 annual Stockton Lecture at the London Business School, published by the CPS as Monetarism Is Not Enough, with a commendatory foreword by Margaret Thatcher warning against continuing neo-Keynesian stop-go boom-bust with Friedmanite rhetoric.
Pemberton (1993) makes a similar point and argues that the rational expectations framework cannot be rescued by recourse to a Friedmanite "as-if", argument.
Development theory has largely given way to Friedmanite economics, and the global North seems ever more resistant to the calls for redistribution of wealth that still often emanate from the South.
Yet this behavior resembles less the historic patterns of discrimination against blacks and women than routine intellectual insularity - the likelihood, for example, that Keynesian econometricians will miss the merits of Friedmanite grand theorists (and vice versa).
Just as Professor Naqvi shows great admiration for the welfare implications of Rawls' concepts, he shows contempt for three main lines of thought in modern economics, namely, rational expectations, Friedmanite monetarism, and Laffer curves.
My paper in Economic Inquiry (and the little book of 1986 published by Macmillan, available, cheap, assign it to your students) was 98 percent teaching, Friedmanite. I was trying to change the taste of the producers and consumers of economic writing.
Despite the vast increase in scope of managerial obligations, a Friedmanite might try to bring stakeholder theory under his or her umbrella.
Sumner rejects the standard Friedmanite monetarist "long and variable lags" approach, and argues that financial markets respond virtually instantly to new information, including announcements and events that would change expectations about the future path of monetary policy.
In a tone that might seem more Naderite than Friedmanite, the authors denounce "the cult of the doctor ...
Klein also blames Friedmanite economics for the Iraq war, for the International Monetary Fund's actions during the Asian economic crisis of the late 1990s, and for the Sri Lankan government's confiscation of fishermen's property to build luxury hotels after the deadly tsunami of 2005.