Fregatidae

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Fregatidae

[fre′gad·ə‚dē]
(vertebrate zoology)
Frigate birds or man-o'-war birds, a family of fish-eating birds in the order Pelecaniformes.

Fregatidae

 

(frigate birds), a family of birds of the order Pelecaniformes. The body length is 78 to 100 cm. The wings are long and pointed; the wingspread reaches 2 m. The tail is long and bifurcate; the legs are short. The toes have long talons and are webbed at the base. The plumage is dark with a metallic sheen. There is one genus, embracing five species. Frigate birds are distributed on tropical oceanic islands. Unlike other seabirds, they do not fly far from their nesting places. Their uropygial, or preen, glands are poorly developed, causing the plumage to become wet easily. Because of this, the birds cannot rest on the water. Frigate birds nest in groups on trees or shrubs, often near colonies of gannets and other seabirds, from whom they seize prey and fledglings. A clutch contains one egg, which is incubated for 40 to 50 days. The birds feed on marine invertebrates, flying fishes, and young seabirds. The species F. ariel migrates to the Soviet Far East.

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Christmas frigatebird (Photo courtesy of DENR via Facebook / MANILA BULLETIN)
Bob Natural, a biologist and MBCFI's monitoring and evaluation officer, first spotted a single juvenile frigatebird flying overhead when a survey team was taking a break along the beach.
Higher Cd concentrations were expected to occur in boobies than in frigatebirds, as cephalopods present a greater importance in the diet of the former species than in that of the latter.
In the early nineteenth century, Ascension Island was home to more than 20 million seabirds, mainly masked boobies, black noddies, brown noddies, and Ascension frigatebirds. The frigatebird was considered to be the most important because it was endemic to the island.
The magnificent frigatebird is listed as a high conservation concern by the North American Waterbird Conservation Plan because a decline in populations is suspected (Kushlan et al., 2002).
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Cimatu underscored the importance of protecting the country's National Parks, such as the Apo Reef National Park (ARNP) in the Province of Occidental Mindoro following the reported sighting of the Christmas frigatebird (Fregata andrewsi) by conservation experts recently.
Going over the list of newbies on the CMS protective list is a treat for the imagination, with names such as Steppe Eagle, Asian Vulture, Sub-Saharan Vulture, Lappet-faced Vulture, Christmas Frigatebird, Black Noddy, Yellow Bunting, Lesser and Great Grey Shrike.
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The adult male Magnificent Frigatebird is currently under the watchful eyes of the zoo's vets after its marathon journey to UK shores.