Fritz the Cat


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Fritz the Cat

a tomcat in every sense. [Comics: Horn, 266–267]
See: Lust
References in periodicals archive ?
Ostensibly a "funny animal" book, a genre that embraces everything from the Garfield comic strip to more mature-minded material like underground comix pioneer Robert Crumb's Fritz the Cat, True Swamp was originally released in the late 1990s.
Crumb of the 1960s underground comic movement - remember Fritz the Cat - and Marc Hempel of DC Comics' "The Sandman" fame.
Among the early directors of the Deputy Dawg Show were Ralph Bakshi who would later become famous for the Fritz the Cat cartoons.
It makes you nostalgic for the innocent smut of Fritz the Cat.
Then and now, one could understand Crumb's comics as opposing the culture of Walt Disney, since his well-known characters have traits that render them unsympathetic, even grotesque, rather than endearing and together offer pointed social allegories: Fritz the Cat, a hippie tom, is self-satisfied, smugly bourgeois, and idealistic but unmotivated; Mr.
Eric Rohmer's film of the 'other O' may have been insufficiently erotic to merit inclusion here, but I did wonder at the credentials of Ralph Bakshi's Fritz the Cat.
He worked acoustically, writing for commercials, TV and films -including music for Ralph Bakshi's 1971 animated movie Fritz the Cat that was rejected by Warner Bros, although it did eventually surface in 1978 as It Happened One Bite, with cover artwork by Hicks himself.
The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat (Fremantle Media, pounds 12.
The new gallery opened with an exhibit showcasing fine art from animator Ralph Bakshi, the director of many animated classics, such as Mighty Mouse, Lord of the Rings and Fritz the Cat.
For those once-"corrupted" youth who lived much or part of this history, it is a joyously nostalgic trip down memory lane, accompanied by the storied names of comic book lore: Superman, Captain America, the Spirit, Spider Man, the Fantastic Four, Fritz the Cat, Zippy, Maus, and especially Batman, who is followed through his numerous metamorphoses over the decades.
He followed that with "Heavy Traffic" and "The Nine Lives of Fritz the Cat," an entry at the Cannes Film Festival.
All I know is that the Feebles make Fritz the Cat look like Garfield.