Frome


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Frome

Lake a shallow salt lake in NE South Australia: intermittently filled with water. Length: 100 km (60 miles). Width: 48 km (30 miles)

Frome

 

a closed lake in South Australia. Lake Frome occupies a flat depression more than 90 km long and approximately 40 km wide that lies east of the Flinders Range. The depression fills with water after heavy rains but is encrusted with salt deposits for most of the year.

References in classic literature ?
That's my place," said Frome, with a sideway jerk of his lame elbow; and in the distress and oppression of the scene I did not know what to answer.
L,' a while back," Frome continued, checking with a twitch of the left rein the bay's evident intention of turning in through the broken-down gate.
In this way we struggled on for another mile or two, and at last reached a point where Frome, peering into what seemed to me formless night, said: "That's my gate down yonder.
Look here, Frome," I began, "there's no earthly use in your going any farther-" but he interrupted me: "Nor you neither.
Frome scrambled up the slippery steps of the porch, digging a way through the snow with his heavily booted foot.
It was that night that I found the clue to Ethan Frome, and began to put together this vision of his story.
Young Ethan Frome walked at a quick pace along the deserted street, past the bank and Michael Eady's new brick store and Lawyer Varnum's house with the two black Norway spruces at the gate.
The effect produced on Frome was rather of a complete absence of atmosphere, as though nothing less tenuous than ether intervened between the white earth under his feet and the metallic dome overhead.
As she passed down the line, her light figure swinging from hand to hand in circles of increasing swiftness, the scarf flew off her head and stood out behind her shoulders, and Frome, at each turn, caught sight of her laughing panting lips, the cloud of dark hair about her forehead, and the dark eyes which seemed the only fixed points in a maze of flying lines.
Hitherto Ethan Frome had been content to think him a mean fellow; but now he positively invited a horse-whipping.
But for this-as Frome sardonically reflected-it would hardly have occurred to Zeena to take any thought for the girl's amusement.
Zeena had always been what Starkfield called "sickly," and Frome had to admit that, if she were as ailing as she believed, she needed the help of a stronger arm than the one which lay so lightly in his during the night walks to the farm.