fruit fly

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fruit fly

fruit fly, common name for any of the flies of the families Tephritidae and Drosophilidae. All fruit flies are very small insects that lay their eggs in various plant tissues. The Tephritidae contains about 1,200 species characterized by wide heads, black or steely green or blue bodies, iridescent greenish eyes, and wings that are usually mottled brown or black. The eggs of most species are laid directly in the pulp of the fruit on which the larvae feed; in North America, blueberries, cherries, and apples are much damaged by these insects. In warm regions, the Mediterranean fruit fly, Ceratitis capitata, was a serious pest of citrus fruits; it has now been eradicated from the S United States. Some species, e.g., the goldenrod gall fly, Eurosta solidaginis, which deposits its eggs in species of goldenrod, lay their eggs in plants of no economic importance. The Drosophilidae, or pomace flies, are yellowish and in the wild are largely found around decaying vegetation. The larvae living in fruit actually feed on the yeasts growing in the fruit. Drosophila melanogaster, also called vinegar fly, is a much used laboratory insect; its 10-day life cycle and large chromosomes, particularly those of the salivary glands of the larva, have made it invaluable in the study of genetics. Fruit flies are classified in the phylum Arthropoda, class Insecta, order Diptera, families Tephritidae and Drosophilidae.
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fruit fly

[′früt ‚flī]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for those acalypterate insects composing the family Tephritidae.
Any insect whose larvae feed on fruit or decaying vegetable matter.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

fruit fly

1. any small dipterous fly of the family Trypetidae, which feed on and lay their eggs in plant tissues
2. any dipterous fly of the genus Drosophila
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
According to the Department of Justice, Fruitfly was used to invade machines of individuals, companies, schools including Case Western Reserve University, a police department and a subsidiary of the U.S.
Dean Faculty of Agriculture Dr Mohammad Amjad Aulakh said that fruitfly management was still a challenge.
While the backup server Wardle set up allowed him to discover the Macs that remained infected by the Fruitfly variant, it also allowed him to quickly analyze how the malware worked.
We also share many genes with more humble organisms - about half with the fruitfly and the nematode worm, and about a fifth with yeast.
Along with Taste, Fruitfly operates a selective door policy that they believe can only add to the night.
In collaboration with the Harvard Medical School Institute of Proteomics, the Berkeley Drosophila Genome Project is creating a set of Drosophila genes using Gateway Technology to propel the Drosophila Genome Project into its next phase of better understanding the fruitfly, Drosophila melanogaster.
(1993) found that different fruiting phenologies between host-plant species tended to be an isolating mechanism between races of the fruitfly Rhagoletis pomonella.
This is in contrast to some mammalian and fruitfly systems in which a 100-fold increase in HSP70 is observed in a comparable time frame (Lindquist 1986).
But access to mainland markets is restricted by transportation costs and Hawaii's fruitfly problem.
MULTAN -- A week long activities from August 21 to 26 for sensitizing growers, middlemen and general public about fruitfly and its eradication began at Mango Research Institute here on Monday.
A security researcher has unveiled new discoveries about Fruitfly, a dangerous macOS malware that has been shrouded in mystery since its discovery earlier this year.