Fuchsine


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Related to Fuchsine: Pararosaniline

Fuchsine

 

(also Magenta I, or rosaniline hydrochloride), C20H20N3Cl, a triphenylmethane dye. One of the first synthetic dyes, it was obtained in 1856 by J. Natanson. It is called fuchsine because its color resembles that of the flowers of the fuchsia plant. Fuchsine occurs as crystals that are dark violet in transmitted light and green in reflected light. The crystals are sparingly soluble in water but readily soluble in alcohol; their aqueous solutions are bright red.

Fuchsine is not used in the modern textile industry because of its poor photostability. Certain fuchsine derivatives, such as Basic Violet 14, are used in the manufacture of pencils, carbon paper, and inks, including inks for ballpoint pens.

References in periodicals archive ?
Investigation on degradation of azo fuchsine using visible light in the presence of heat-treated anatase Ti[O.
The evaluation of a previously colored plaque was conducted with the help of fuchsine indicator.
Basic fuchsine (1%) solution (BS Pharma, Belo Horizonte, Brazil) was applied with a cotton tip to analyze the dental biofilm, and the excess fuchsine was removed by rinsing with water.
The strain grew on Brucella agar supplemented with 5% horse serum in the presence of basic fuchsine, thionine, and growth on safranin O.
To build the slides, the cuts were clarified with sodium hypochlorite 1%, washed with distilled water, stained with astra blue and fuchsine and fixed with glycerin in semi permanent slides for viewing in an optical microscope.
15% basic fuchsine, and the 2[micro]m-thick sections were stained with Mayer's haematoxylin, azocarmine solution, and anilineblue-orange G.
The test of efficiency degradation was carried out through LiP degradation of azo fuchsine dye in aqueous solution under the existence of H2O2.