Fuggers


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Fuggers

16th-century German financiers. [Ger. Hist.: NCE, 1023–1024]
See: Wealth
References in periodicals archive ?
The volume was dedicated to the "illustrious signor Gioan Fugger, Baron of Kirchberg and Weissenhorn" (All'ilustrissimo signor il signor Gioan Fugger barone di Kirchberg et Weissenhorn).
Stimulus for this may have come with the building of Fuggerei, an ideal social settlement within the city of Augsburg (43) built by Jacob Fugger, nicknamed 'the rich', a wealthy banking merchant and patron of the arts, and of Durer.
Subsequent chapters describe the people who worked for the Fugger companies, the family's patronage of art, and their participation in society.
In his camp outside, he borrowed a final six thousand florins from the Fuggers in order to prolong the siege.
A name you will come across frequently while walking Augsburg's streets is the Fugger family.
In 1515, at the instigation of Conrad Peutinger, the town clerk in Augsburg, Johann Eck wrote a treatise defending the so-called triple contract, a business agreement favored by banking houses such as the Fuggers that was designed to insure a guaranteed rate of return (in this case 5 percent).
In the next town, Augsburg, I discovered the Fuggerei - 167 houses and apartments donated to the city's poor in the 17th century by the Fuggers, a family of cloth merchants, and believed to be the oldest subsidised housing development in the world.
At the height of their power, the Fuggers had branch offices in all the main commercial centers of Europe, and by the 16th century even in the Americas.
Even during the late Middle Ages, feudal lords, kings, and even emperors were not necessarily much richer than their vassals--one remembers, for instance, how Emperor Maximilian died penniless (during the last days of his life, no inn could be found that would lodge him and his followers) and how Charles V's election was brought about by the money provided by the Fuggers family.
See RICHARD EHRENBERG, CAPITAL & FINANCE IN THE AGE OF THE RENAISSANCE: A STUDY OF THE FUGGERS AND THEIR CONNECTIONS 243-44 (H.
Indo-Portuguese Trade and the Fuggers of Germany: Sixteenth Century.