Fukuyama


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Fukuyama

(fo͞oko͞o`yämä), city (1990 pop. 365,612), Hiroshima prefecture, W Honshu, Japan, on the Ashida River. It is an important commercial, industrial, and communications center, producing machinery, Japanese harps (kotos), rubber products, electronics, textiles, and processed foods.
The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fukuyama

 

a city in Japan, on the island of Honshu, in Hiroshima Prefecture. Situated on the Ashida River, near the place where the river empties into the Hiuchi Sea. Population, 296,000 (1974). Industry is represented by ferrous metallurgy and the manufacture of chemical products, pharmaceuticals, aircraft, and various types of machinery.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
'We can think,' Fukuyama said, 'of neoclassical economics as being, say, 80 percent correct: it has uncovered important truths about the nature of money and markets because its fundamental model of rational, self-interested human behavior is correct about 80 percent of the time.'
IN THE BEGINNING OF IDENTITY: THE Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment, Francis Fukuyama asserts that identity politics is "a master concept that unifies much of what is going on in world politics today." As this overly ambitious, muddled little book unfolds, it turns out to be the master concept that explains almost every major global political development not just today but for the past two centuries.
Francis Fukuyama's Identity loosely expounds on this line of thinking by arguing that liberal democracies are healthiest when they foster inclusive national communities, rather than a bunch of narrow identities among the aggrieved.
Fukuyama justifies the contemporary dissatisfaction with the global liberal order through increasing demand for recognition and explains that identity is often explicitly connected to race, ethnicity or religion.
Fukuyama believes this fixation is a modern phenomenon, caused by the uprooting of rural dwellers from their communities.
Fukuyama in our Japan SPOTLIGHT May/June 2018 issue, with its cover story titled "Anxious Individuals and Governments at a Standstill".
According to Fukuyama, two factors are likely to cause this explosion.
Fukuyama is the Olivier Nomellini Senior Fellow at the Freeman Spogli Institute for International Studies (FSI), Stanford's premier research institute for international studies, and Mosbacher Director of FSI's Center on Democracy, Development, and the Rule of Law.
Speaking on the second day of the World Government Summit (WGS), renowned political scientist and economist Francis Fukuyama said the Gulf has been playing their part well.
(TAP) - Prescribing a genuine rule of law capable of ensuring law enforcement and balancing powers and promoting fight against nepotism and corruption would be the way to increase economic growth and achieve integrated social development," said American economist and political scientist Francis Fukuyama.
In The End of History and the Last Man, Francis Fukuyama argues: What we may be witnessing is not just the end of the Cold War, or the passing of a particular period of postwar history, but the end of history as such that is, the end point of mankind's ideological evolution and the universalization of Western liberal democracy as the final form of human government.