Fulcher of Chartres


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Fulcher of Chartres

 

Born circa 1059, in Chartres; died circa 1127 or 1128. French priest and chronicler.

Fulcher of Chartres took part in the First Crusade (1096–99). In 1097 he accompanied Baldwin of Flanders as his chaplain in a march on Edessa. After 1100 he held high posts at the royal court in Jerusalem. His chronicle, which was kept until 1127 and was based on personal impressions, eyewitness testimonies, and documents, was one of the most reliable sources on the history of the important events of the First Crusade and the early history of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.

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Humbert attributes all his stories about Antioch to a work by Fulcher of Chartres called the Hystoria Antiochena.
One possible explanation for this silence is that Humbert was in fact using a history of Antioch that, like Fulcher of Chartres's chronicle, said little about the capture of Jerusalem as compared to events at Antioch.
Like Jacobus de Voragine, Gobi does not associate this source with Fulcher of Chartres, nor with the Chanson d'Antioche or the Estoire de Jerusalem et d'Antioche.
Like most of his predecessors, Bromyard does not name Fulcher of Chartres in association with this source.
Composed around 1221, the Estoire is a short Old French history of the First Crusade adapted from the chronicle of Fulcher of Chartres. Duparc-Quioc asserts that both Stephen and the author of the Estoire used the Provencal Antioche when recounting their tales about Rainald.
(48) For the years covering the First Crusade, the Historia Nicaena vel Antiochena represents a paraphrase of the chronicles by Robert of Rheims and Fulcher of Chartres. Again, the association of this work with that of Fulcher is intriguing but a careful examination of its contents reveals that it also cannot be the Hystoria Antiochena.
It does, however, correspond to information found in Fulcher of Chartres's chronicle about a battle against the Muslims outside of Ramla in August 1105.
This information makes it possible to identify the engagement in question as a battle fought on 28 June 1113 at as-Sinnabrah to the south of Lake Tiberius, in which Baldwin I and his army were defeated by the joint forces of Sharaf al-Din Mawdud, lord of Mosul, and Tughtagin, atabek of Damascus, and which was also described by Fulcher of Chartres.(5)
5 Fulcher of Chartres, Historia Hierosolymitana (1095-1127), ed.
Sources: Fulcher of Chartres, Deeds of the Franks (Gesta Francorum).