complete blood count

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complete blood count

[kəm′plēt ′bləd ‚kau̇nt]
(pathology)
Differential and absolute determinations of the numbers of each type of blood cell in a sample and, by extrapolation, in the general circulation.
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The accuracy of the full blood count and CD4 values was subject to strict internal and external quality assurance procedures.
Further blood tests including screening for viral infections, clotting studies, kidney function tests, full blood count and SBAs were requested.
The patient presented in the Emergency Department four hours later and similar full blood count results were obtained, where eosinophils accounted for 46% of the total white cell count.
Blood results showed a reduced serum albumin at 32g/dL, with normal Full Blood Count, Urea and Electrolytes, and Liver Function.
Peripheral blood smears may be useful in interpreting unusually rapid changes in full blood count parameters.
Investigations, including a computed tomography (CT) head scan, full blood count, HIV ELISA test, thyroid function test and rapid plasma reagin (RPR) screen were done but the results were unremarkable.
He said he ordered a full blood count as he was investigating the possibility of a haemathorax, but that this was not done urgently.
Systemic disease should be excluded by carrying out a full history and clinical examination, full blood count, renal and hepatic function tests, thyroid tests and age appropriate screening for hematological and solid organ malignancies.
A full blood count showed the hemoglobin value to be 12.
The High Court writ accuses Swansea NHS Trust of negligently failing to take account of Alexander's signs and symptoms, failing to consider that he might have septic shock, failing to take bloods for culture and a full blood count, and failing to give him intravenous antibiotics shortly after admission.
He detected a slight heart murmur and sent me for an ECG and a full blood count just to be on the safe side.
At the referral hospital, a full blood count was done to investigate the anaemia.