complete blood count

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complete blood count

[kəm′plēt ′bləd ‚kau̇nt]
(pathology)
Differential and absolute determinations of the numbers of each type of blood cell in a sample and, by extrapolation, in the general circulation.
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More than 65% of physicians who responded to the survey were noted to perform full blood counts frequently to monitor patients with suspected or confirmed dengue.
Table 1 Breakdown of operative procedures in each group Operative procedure Group Group A B Open reduction and internal fixation of distal fibula 14 10 Open reduction and internal fixation of medial malleolus 4 3 Open reduction and internal fixation of bimalleolar fracture 7 8 Open reduction and internal fixation of trimalleolar fracture 0 2 Tension band wiring patella fracture 2 0 Open reduction and internal fixation of tibial plateau 3 8 Manipulation under anaesthesia for fracture 0 3 Total 30 34 Table 2 Co-morbidities in both groups Group A Group B Hypertension 0 8 Hyperthyroidism 0 1 Diabetes 0 0 Table 3 Estimated unit cost range Estimated unit cost range ([pounds sterling]) Minimum Maximum Full blood count 0.
Considering the increased prevalence of fungal infections among HIV1-positive patients, (3-5) full blood count evaluation is best accompanied by morphological evaluation to detect any discrepancies between automated counts and actual observation.
Further blood tests including screening for viral infections, clotting studies, kidney function tests, full blood count and SBAs were requested.
The inquest heard the results of the full blood count were not acted upon until after midnight on February 23, seven hours after the test was ordered.
Full blood count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and biochemistry were normal.
Among the errors were patients receiving transfusions incompatible with their blood group or rhesus status, patients given unnecessary transfusions because of spurious full blood count or coagulation screen results, and failure to meet special transfusion requirements, such as the need for irradiated cellular components in patients at risk of transfusion-associated graft-versus host disease.
a detailed history and a thorough physical examination, followed by laboratory investigations (as per clinical suspicion), including a full blood count.
Alcohol testing will include a hair strand test as well as liver function, cdt and full blood count.
Organic work-up including full blood count, liver and renal function tests, thyroid function test, ceruloplasmin and serum copper levels, urine toxicology, computed tomographic scan of the brain, and electroencephalography were all unremarkable.