Fumaria


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Related to Fumaria: fumitory, Fumaria indica
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fumaria

 

a genus of plants of the family Fumariaceae. They are annual herbs with alternate, narrowly dissected leaves. The corollas are rose-violet, sometimes white, with a single short spur, and there are two stamens. The fruit is nutlike. There are about 55 species in Europe, growing chiefly in the Mediterranean region, in the Caucasus, in Asia (as far as Central Asia and the Himalayas), and in Africa. In the USSR there are ten species. The best known species is fumitory (F. officinalis), with grayish leaves that appear smoky and rose-violet blossoms. This species may be found primarily in the forest zone of the European part of the USSR and in Western Siberia, where it grows in fields, on fallow, and in gardens. Fumitory, which contains fumaric acid, has been used in folk medicine.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Previously, in vitro and in planta nematicidal activity of Fumaria parviflora Lam (Fumariaceae) extracts was evaluated against the southern RKN, M.
Common bitters used typically 10-30 minutes before a meal, include ginger (Zingiber officinale) rhizome, dandelion (Taraxacum officinalis), fumitory (Fumaria officianlis) leaf, wormwood (Artemisia spp.), gentian (Gentiana spp.) root, candytuft (Iberis amara) and artichoke (Cynara scolymus) leaf.
Mae mwg y ddaear cyffredin (Fumaria officinalis) yma; blodyn bach braidd yn ddisylw ydi hwn hefo blodau bach pinc a'u blaenau yn binc tywyllach yn ffurfio sbigyn hir ar hyd y coesyn.
Unicontrozon C-49 INCI name: propylene glycol (and) citrus medico limonum (lemon) extract (and) fumaria officinalis extract (and) fumaric acid, Suggested use level: 2.5-5%.
Fumaria procumbens on Oland--population dynamics of a disjunct species at the northern limit of its range.
186-193) also includes photographs of the larval bags of 48 species in 18 of these genera, with clearly discernable bits of foliage or twigs on the bags of 41 species, including species from the most primitive of these genera, Solenobia and Fumaria. Thus both bag making and bag adornment are ancestral to Thyridopteryx.
If they are yellow it is Corydalis lutea but if they are a pinky-purple, then it is the closely-related Fumitory, probably Fumaria purpurea.
Dominant weed during winter were Malilotus indica and Sorghum helepense under zero tilled plots and Fumaria perviflora under conventional and deep tilled plots, respectively.