nutraceutical

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nutraceutical

[‚nü·trə′süd·ə·kəl]
(biochemistry)
Any food or food ingredient that is medically beneficial to an organism, including preventing disease.
References in periodicals archive ?
Growing consumer concerns about healthy and nutritional food products are increasing and as a result of this, consumers are shifting preference towards healthy as well as nutritional products, which is driving the revenue growth of the functional food and beverages segment.
The functional food ingredients market is segmented on the basis of types into proteins & amino acids, vitamins, minerals, prebiotics, probiotics, hydrocolloids, omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, essential oils, and flavonoids & carotenoids.
But retailers looking to enter and compete in the functional foods and beverages category with their own brands have to give strong attention to quality.
Considering the novelty and underdevelopment of the functional food industry in Romania, in order to investigate and align experts' views, it was implemented a three rounds Delphi survey--a consecrated explorative research tool, usually used to gain consensus among a heterogeneous experts panel in an emerging scientific domain.
As we look towards 2010 and beyond, it is clear that the functional food sector is evolving.
Functional foods has historically been an innovative sector, although innovation levels have fallen in the past year.
We used data for grocery purchases made by 7,195 households in 603 food product categories and household demographic data from an AC Nielsen Homescan Data set from 1999 to examine the functional food purchases of consumer households in order to gain insight into some of their buying characteristics.
Over 55s are the least likely to purchase these products, with the exception of margarine or spreads that control cholesterol, yet their vast number makes them the most important age group for the functional foods market The lower usage of functional foods among older adults is most likely attributable to a lack of perceived need and skepticism regarding their effectiveness.
Oats act as a functional food and can be labelled accordingly, however it is the intrinsic characteristic of oats that are functional, not an added dietary component.
In 1998, Health Canada proposed the definition of a functional food to be similar in appearance to a conventional food, consumed as part of the usual diet, with demonstrated physiological benefits, and/or to reduce the risk of chronic disease beyond basic nutritional functions.
Farmers must also own the processing and/ or marketing of functional food products.
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