Funeral

(redirected from Funerary rite)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.
Related to Funerary rite: Funeral service

What does it mean when you dream about a funeral?

People often dream about watching their own funerals. This usually indicates that part of one’s life—or perhaps old ways of seeing things—have died. Alternatively, it can mean that one feels like some aspect of one’s life is dead. Someone else’s funeral in a dream can represent the unconscious desire to see that particular person dead, or a fear that someone might die.

Funeral

Viking funeral
given to Michael Geste by his younger brother, as in their childhood games. [Br. Lit.: P. C. Wren Beau Geste in Benét, 87]

Funeral

(dreams)
Dreaming about funerals does not necessarily symbolize physical death for you or anyone else. It could instead symbolize an ending of a different kind. You may be burying relationships, conditions, or even emotions that you no longer need and that are no longer conducive to your personal growth. On the other hand, this dream may symbolize the burying of sensitivities and emotions that are too difficult to cope with. It may reflect numbness or a feeling that is the opposite of aliveness, such as depression and emptiness. Either way, burying a person that is alive suggests some emotional turmoil. Please consider all of the details in this dream to find the appropriate message. Old dream interpretation books say that dreaming about funerals is a dream of the contrary. Instead of sadness, the dreamer will experience happiness and go to celebrations, such as weddings.
References in periodicals archive ?
They also show that monks regularly perform funerary rites despite the lack of ritual instructions in any early Buddhist textual sources.
9) In my rereading of this document, I argue that the model of opposition between bon and gshen is based on a false dichotomy, and that these two classes of priests were identical, or nearly identical, ritual specialists involved mostly in healing, divination, and funerary rites.
He was given the name "Nelson" by a school teacher in the Methodist primary school he attended as a child in his ancestral village Qunu--the same place where he was laid to rest according to Xhosa traditional funerary rites on December 15, 2013.
These comprise standard funerary rituals for the "good" dead (with highly specific variants for dead monks, for instance) and special rituals for the "bad" dead (a particularly rich theme in Asian cultures, as we know from the studies edited by Baptandier), but also annual communal rituals or festivals that aim at addressing still unresolved (or unsatisfactorily resolved) death matters-- potentially dangerous wandering ghosts who have not received funerary rites, or who have not found the passage to rebirth or to the afterworld, as well as the suffering denizens of hell.
Specialists in the art of Asia, Europe, or Latin America explore such topics as Chinese export porcelain for the Mexican colonial market, a foldout map of the Manila galleons and their trade network in 1610, the catafalque of Margaret of Austria and royal funerary rites in 17th-century Lima, sculptural replication in the early modern transatlantic world, and casta paintings and self-fashioning artists in New Spain.
Hurst Park staged racing for the last time on October 10, 1962, when nearly 6,000 turned up to observe the funerary rites and the valedictory race was won by Anassa, trained by Towser Gosden and ridden by Des Cullen.
A discussion of the war's casualties and funerary rites makes up the final section of this chapter.
It is intended as a contribution to the anthropological study of ritual and to the ethnography of Borneo religion in which the study of shamanistic life rituals has been overshadowed by a longstanding fascination with death and funerary rites [author].
A town hall report says: "Funeral directors and faith groups whose funerary rites require cremation have expressed demands for a local crematorium.
No one is more familiar with the rituals and cadences of modern funerary rites than the American poet, essayist and undertaker, Lynch; just as no one had a better ear for the sound of the human voice than Terkel, gathering stories of work; as for Larry, Moe and Curly, they speak for themselves.
On Burying the Dead: Funerary Rites and the Dialectic of Freedom and Nature in Hegel's Phenomenology of Spirit, DAVID CIAVATTA
Hindus in Leicester, for instance, have been fighting to construct a Hindu crematorium, but planners do not seem to understand the special rituals surrounding the funerary rites in the community.