URN

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urn

Botany the spore-producing capsule of a moss

Urn

A vase of varying size and shape, usually having a footed base or pedestal, and used as a decorative device; originally, to contain ashes from the dead.

urn

[ərn]
(botany)
The theca of a moss.

URN

URN

(Uniform Resource Name) A name that identifies a resource on the Internet. Unlike URLs, which use network addresses (domain, directory path, file name), URNs use regular words that are protocol and location independent. Providing a higher level of abstraction, URNs are persistent (never change) and require a resolution service similar to the DNS system in order to convert names into real addresses. For the most part, URNs have evolved into XRI identifiers (see XDI). See URI and URL.
References in periodicals archive ?
The identity of the deceased has also been the subject of heated discussion in archaeological studies of South Iberia; debates on whether tombs belong to phoenicians or indigenous persons, based on the grave goods and the funerary urns used, are deeply embedded in discussions on Tartessos and the 'Orientalising' period in Iberia (Wagner and Alvar 1989: 94-95; Belen 2001; Torres 2002: 354-359, 2004; Escacena 2004; Pappa 2012).
Anyone can do an English-language Google search to learn about Thai "sports and games" (an entry under "S" in this dictionary), but very few people can find the name of the fourth daughter of King Mongkut who may have sponsored three important monasteries or the name of an artist from Southern Thailand who designed funerary urns for local nobles.
Students have used the technology to create anything from teapots, to barbecue grilles and, fascinatingly enough, funerary urns, depending upon the assignment.
There was even a skeleton of a woman laid out as she was found in her burial chamber, head and feet pointing to the left and funerary urns near her head.
When murder results and mysterious funerary urns appear, Phyrne sets out on one of the most dangerous investigations of her life.
Among the most exciting discoveries are funerary urns dating to AD 1400-1700 in caves and rock shelters along the Maraca River near the mouth of the Amazon.
who seems to be caressing the Tree of Life; winged creatures on Etruscan mirrors; a marble Eros; a winged being on a shaft a metre high surrounded by candle holders made five hundred years before the birth of Christ; alabaster fragments from funerary urns and sarcophagi.