Furanose


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furanose

[′fyu̇r·ə‚nōs]
(biochemistry)
A sugar whose cyclic or ring structure resembles that of furan.

Furanose

 

a ring-shaped monosaccharide containing a five-member furan ring. Unlike the six-member (pyranose) form, fu-ranoses are less stable and for most monosaccharides exist only in aqueous solutions and in substantially smaller quantities than pyranoses. The tendency to form a furanose ring is clearly visible, for example, in fructose, which in furanose form is also a component of many oligosaccharides and polysaccharides, such as inu-lin. Most of the monosaccharides in glycosides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides have the pyranose form. Glycosides in which the sugar part is represented by furanoses are called furanosides.

References in periodicals archive ?
Deleavey et al., "Dramatic effect of furanose C2' substitution on structure and stability: Directing the folding of the human telomeric quadruplex with a single fluorine atom," Journal of the American Chemical Society, vol.
To compare the antibacterial activities of furanose and pyranose sugar benzoates with that of disaccharide benzoates we deliberately prepared octa-O-benzoylsucrose (14) and octa-O-benzoyl-[alpha]-lactose (15).
These pyranose monosaccharides were more effective than that of five-membered furanose (2-5) and disaccharide octabenzoates (14 ,15).
Benzoylated sugars with fivemembered furanose form are less effective against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive than that of the corresponding six-membered pyranose form.
This is also clear from the variation in the peak position of the infrared band markers at 1580 nm (crystalline region in cellulose), 1705 nm (aromatic skeletal in ligin) and 1773 (furanose or pyranose ring constituent of hemicellulose) at different temperatures.
first Furanose or 13 overtone pyranose ring of hemicellulose 7 1824 OH str.
However, these results directly indicate that the degradation of CH in the aromatic skeletal region due to lignin and the degradation of CH in the furanose (or pyranose) region due to hemicellulose contributed to the yellowing of the wood samples.
It was also suggested that CH in the aromatic skeletal region due to lignin and CH in the furanose (or pyranose) region due to hemicellulose could be easily decomposed.
These results indicated that the degradation of CH in the aromatic skeletal region due to lignin and the degradation of CH in the furanose (or pyranose) region due to hemicellulose contributed to the yellowing of the wood samples.
For example, nucleoside analogs in which the furanose ring has been replaced by other heterocyclic rings such as isoxazoles, isoxazolines, or triazoles [4].