Furmanov


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The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Furmanov

 

(until 1941, Sereda), a city under oblast jurisdiction and the administrative center of Furmanov Raion, Ivanovo Oblast, RSFSR. Railroad station on the Ivanovo-Nerekhta-Leningrad line. Population, 41,000 (1974). Industry includes a factory of the Ivmashdetal’ Ivanovo Production Association, a clothing factory, and three factories for the spinning and weaving of cotton. The city has branches of textile and machine-building technicums. It was given its present name in honor of D. A. Furmanov, who was born in the city. A museum devoted to the writer is located in Furmanov.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Turning from the Jewish experience to the language of the Soviet state, Michael Gorham's brilliant contribution juxtaposes Red Cavalry with Dmitrii Furmanov's Chapaev, a foundational text in the Soviet literary canon instrumental in developing a new revolutionary discourse.
Two citizens of Kazakhstan and the Kyrgyzstan are charged for the murder.According to investigators, in December 2009, the defendants invited Pavlyuk to Almaty, booked a room in "Kazakhstan" hotel, and then fraudulently took him to an apartment down Furmanov street.
Hellbeck covers a somewhat wider range of materials than does Paperno, examining the diaries of well-known writers such as Dmitrii Furmanov, Iurii Olesha, and Aleksandr Afinogenov as well as those kept by members of the former intelligentsia, who resisted and then struggled to adapt to the new order, and, most symptomatic of all, those of several vydvizhentsy, men who ascended from obscure provincial or rural origins to acquire an education (typically technological) and some sort of public role (e.g., as brigade leader at work, as agitator, etc.).
In the words of bartender Anatoli Furmanov, "It's the perfect late-afternoon refreshment.
Chapaev, a novel by Dimitri Furmanov and a film of the same name by Sergei and Georgii Vasillev, enjoyed a great success among the combatants.
Chapter 2 looks at authors such as Dmitrii Furmanov, Iurii Libedinskii, and Fedor Gladkov (a writer for whom use of first editions is particularly important), while the following chapter considers texts by Vsevolod Ivanov, Boris Lavrenev, Andrei Platonov, and Boris Pil'niak.
Pelevin's novel deconstructs Dmitri Furmanov's socialist-realist classic, Chapaev (1923), a novel about a cantankerous, undereducated Red Army cavalry commander who over time became the focus of hundreds of popular jokes in the Soviet Union.
34.Dmitry Furmanov, "Elita tiagotitsia svoim liderom," Obshchaia Gazeta, 1 July 1999.
But African novels of anticolonial war even more directly recall the prominence of the Civil War of 1917-1920 in early Soviet socialist realism, with such important works as Dmitry Furmanov's Chapayev (1923), Sholokhov's Quiet Flows the Don, Alexander Serafimovich's The Iron Flood, Fadeyev's The Rout, Nikolai Ostrovsky's How the Steel Was Tempered, and Alexei Tolstoy's The Ordeal focusing centrally on that crucial early moment in Soviet history.