Fusarium

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Fusarium

[fyü′za·rē·əm]
(mycology)
A genus of fungi in the family Tuberculariaceae having sickle-shaped, multicelled conidia; includes many important plant pathogens.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Fusarium

 

a genus of fungi of the class Fungi Imperfecti. It includes nine sections, 26 species, and 29 races. The fungi reproduce asexually by means of conidia, which vary in form, size, structure, and method of formation. The oval or ovate microconidia are one-or two-celled and form both on conidiophores and directly on the short ramuli of the mycelium. The macroconidia, which are four-to seven-celled, are falciform or fusiform-falciform. They form on branched conidiophores that are frequently gathered into distinctive pulvini—bright orange, violet, or pink sporodochia. Fusaria are also capable of forming chlamydospores during a period of intensive mycelial growth. Several species bear their spores in perithecia.

Most species are saprophytes that live in the soil on plant residues. There are many parasitic species that cause harmful plant diseases called fusarium wilts. Some species secrete toxic substances that are harmful to plants. The use of rye, wheat, barley, oats, and other plants contaminated by fusarial toxins leads to the development of alimentary-toxic aleukia in humans and fusariotoxicosis in animals. When proliferating, the mycelium of Fusarium aguaeductum, which is waterborne, can clog water pipes.

M. A. LITVINOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Desalermos et al., "Fusarium infection: report of 26 cases and review of 97 cases from the literature," Medicine, vol.
Ramphal, "Use of amphotericin B lipid complex for treatment of disseminated cutaneous Fusarium infection in a neutropenic patient," Clinical Infectious Diseases, vol.
Treatment of Fusarium infection is a challenging issue, particularly in the immunocompromised host.
It is not known, however, if any symptomless seeds harbored Fusarium infections.
Transformation of barley with native antifungal genes--targeted expression and monitoring of Fusarium infection. p.
Fusarium infections in burns patients: a case report and review of the literature.
One case-control study was conducted for each fungal species outbreak (Fusarium infections associated with Franck's BBG administered during vitrectomies and Bipolaris infections associated with Franck's triamcinolone injected intravitreally); only species-confirmed cases (i.e., cases confirmed by culture) were included.
Those six reports of noninfectious keratitis--or general eye inflammation--among contact lens wearers were not related to fusarium infections and did not require medical treatment, according to the company.
The Latitude Guide to Root and Stem-based Disease Identification gives a practical step-by-step checklist to telling the difference between whiteheads caused by Take-all, eyespot, sharp eyespot and fusarium infections.
Although this method is currently the mostly widely used to control Fusarium infections, it is not a long-term solution to the prevalence of diseases in crops due to expense, concerns on risks of exposure, residual effects, toxicity to non-target organisms and other health and environmental hazards.