Fuzzy-Wuzzy


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Fuzzy-Wuzzy

name for bushy-haired Sudanese warriors celebrated in a Kipling ballad. [Br. Lit.: Kipling Barrack-Room Ballads in Benét, 81]
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I sang "Fuzzy-Wuzzy" for him, or at least the two stanzas Dawson recorded, and wrote it out, and explained the references.
Such behaviour on the part of those constructed as friendly 'fuzzy-wuzzy angels', and the perceived necessity to hang them as punishment had become a source of confusion some fifty-four years later.
It is arguable that the homogeneous representation by Australia Remembers of 'fuzzy-wuzzy angels', and the attention drawn to the war by the commemorative programme, contributed to the lingering confusion surrounding these events, shared by Europeans as well as Orokaivans.
Such a narrative maintained a silence about wartime behaviour which was regarded as unpatriotic or traitorous, thereby nurturing the 'fuzzy-wuzzy' construction.
Skate willingly engaged with the imagery of 'fuzzy-wuzzy angels' as stereotypical colonial subjects who did not exercise choices in response to the war's disruption of their lives.
Rudyard Kipling, bard of empire, had recently written in grudging admiration of one especially resolute imperial foe: An' `ere's to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy, with your `ayrick `ead of `air
In the savage battle which ensued the British square was penetrated, and Tommy Atkins learned a healthy respect for the "Fuzzy-Wuzzy".
Fuzzy-wuzzy tales of corporate executives reading Dr.
THE Queen used an ethnic slur in describing the hair of the premier of Papua New Guinea as "fuzzy-wuzzy", top travel writer Paul Theroux claims.
Fuzzy-wuzzy hair!" Then he claims she added: "There is no other way to describe it.
And she had fuzzy-wuzzy hair too."Another guest said: "That would be Rabbie Namaliu."