Dostoevsky

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Dostoevsky

, Dostoyevsky, Dostoevski, Dostoyevski
Fyodor Mikhailovich . 1821--81, Russian novelist, the psychological perception of whose works has greatly influenced the subsequent development of the novel. His best-known works are Crime and Punishment (1866), The Idiot (1868), The Possessed (1871), and The Brothers Karamazov (1879--80)
References in periodicals archive ?
Fakhar Zaman's novel reminds one of Fyodor Dostoevsky, Antonio Gramsci, Nikolai Ostrovsky and many others who wrote from prison.
At the St Petersburg Economic Forum, he quoted Fyodor Dostoevsky. At a time when US President Donald Trump -- who once called his relationship with his Chinese counterpart "outstanding" -- is waging a trade war against China, Xi needs a new "best friend." In his own words, that is what he has found in Putin.
Aubrey's creative philosophy is perfectly summed up in this heartwarming quote from Fyodor Dostoevsky:
When I was reading Fyodor Dostoevsky's 'Crime and Punishment,' I was obsessed with it.
Many prominent Russian writers such as Anton Chekhov (1860-1904), Fyodor Dostoevsky (1821-1881), Ivan Goncharov (1812-1891), Alexander Pushkin (1799-1837) and Leo Tolstoy (1828-1910) are popular in Korea and their literary works have touched our hearts deeply.
Alexis de Tocqueville, Victor Hugo, Karl Marx, Frederick Douglass, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Rosa Luxemburg, and Adolf Hitler were among the many who put their pens to the task.
"If they behave in a civilised way, I will shake their hand," added Gorbachev, who said he studied French and read the works of Fyodor Dostoevsky and Mikhail Bulgakov while serving his sentence at Marseille's Baumettes prison.
Fyodor Dostoevsky, a Russian novelist, wrote in Brothers Karamazov: "Ivan said: the death of an innocent child is seen to be an inescapable objection to God's goodness, (therefore) I hasten to give back my entrance ticket (to Heaven)."
With psychological insight that rivals the great novels of Fyodor Dostoevsky, the twenty-one linked narratives that make up the collection present us with everyday people, with everyday problems — and teach us to love and respect the former, and bear the latter.
The narrative is permeated with Cem's awareness of other literary texts, including those of Jules Verne, Fyodor Dostoevsky and Dante, as metaphor for his own predicaments or perceptions.
In The Brothers Karamazov, Ivan Karamazov delivers a diatribe on theodicy: assailing Christianity and faith in a God who lets innocent children suffer, he states that there is a "peculiar quality [that] exists in much of mankind--this love of torturing children, but only children." (1) Undeniably, the physical and psychological abuse of children is a recurrent theme in Fyodor Dostoevsky's fiction and journalism, particularly in his Writer's Diary (2)
This contrasted poetry and prose by Fyodor Dostoevsky and Boris Pasternak, who were persecuted by the Czarist and Communist regimes respectively.