G-LOC


Also found in: Acronyms, Wikipedia.

G-LOC

G-LOCclick for a larger image
Relationship between acceleration and time at maximum G required to produce symptoms of gray out and black out.
A g-induced (centrifugal acceleration) loss of consciousness. A condition that occurs when the g loading is above 5 or 6 continuously for more than 5 to 7 s. Unconsciousness follows because of the temporary stoppage of the blood supply to the brain. However, this phenomenon does not occur if the buildup of g is very rapid only momentarily, as during ejection. The chances of G-LOC can be minimized by use of anti-g suits, anti-g maneuvers, and a higher level of physical fitness. See also anti-g suits.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Since its integration in 2011, the Air Force has not had a Class A or Class E G-LOC while a pilot was wearing the full-coverage G-suit.
This is due largely to fatal midair collisions, Controlled Flight into Terrain (CFIT), and G-Induced Loss of Consciousness (G-LOC).
This condition leads to decreased blood flow to the brain, which becomes hypoxic, and the aviator may G-LOC. This phenomenon can occur at any altitude.
Because it is harder for the heart to maintain adequate pressures, this promotes decreased G-induced Loss of Consciousness (G-LOC) tolerance.
Once core temperature rises, sweating starts, dehydration ensues and we are removing some of our G-LOC buffer.
It still took a couple seconds for him to become coherent; his condition reminded me of G-LOC.