gamble


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gamble

a bet, wager, or other risk or chance taken for possible monetary gain
www.betinf.com
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Both Thomas and Crisp (1998) observe that many women who gamble experience considerable shame and guilt, and may be reluctant to seek assistance because of the stigma associated with being a woman who gambles.
* Gambles as a way of escaping from problems or of relieving a dysphoric mood (e.g., feelings of helplessness, guilt, anxiety, depression).
* Do you prevent your family and friends from knowing how much you gamble?
In this article, the authors first summarize the decision in Procter & Gamble and then consider why it is unlikely the Supreme Court will reconsider or limit its holding in First Security Bank.
The city council estimated in 2016 the number of gambling houses, pubs and other venues where people can gamble at about 300, according to the Trend weekly.
- The regulation of opportunities to gamble, whose most relevant variables are the availability and accessibility of gambling activities, and
"While some of us still visit our local pub and the high street bookmaker the places where we tend to drink and where we gamble has changed in recent times.
He added: "The widespread availability of cheap alcohol and the growth of gambling websites has meant that it's never been easier to drink and gamble, day or night, and the potential for running into problems has increased as a consequence."
Do you chase losses or gamble to get out of financial trouble?
Most people are able to gamble with little or no adverse consequences; they are commonly referred to as "social gamblers."
Results of the first national survey of its kind show problem gambling--described as gambling with three or more negative consequences (for example, betting more than intended or stealing money to gamble) in the past year--occurring at a rate of 2.1% among youth ages 14 to 21.
Problem gamblers also were more likely to gamble alone--43% versus 24% for nonproblem gamblers.