GCVS


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GCVS

Abbrev. for General Catalog of Variable Stars , a publication providing a comprehensive list of variable objects compiled under the direction of the Russian astronomer P.N. Kholopov. The fourth edition in its printed form (1985–90) listed 28 484 stars that had been confirmed as variables by 1982, giving their positions for the epoch 1950.0. The most salient sections of its five volumes are available in computerized form from the Sternberg Institute, Moscow. The first four volumes deal with variable stars within the Milky Way system, the fifth catalogs 10 979 variables in 35 extragalactic star systems, including the Magellanic Clouds and the Andromeda and Triangulum galaxies. There is also a catalog of 984 confirmed and suspected extragalactic supernovae. The New Catalog of Suspected Variable Stars (compiled by B.V. Kukarkin et al and published in its latest revision in 1982) gives the positions, magnitudes, variability types and alternative identifications of 14 811 stars whose variability was still not confirmed before 1980; a supplement to this publication lists 11 206 stars that were still unconfirmed as variables by 1997.
References in periodicals archive ?
This genome displayed a typical GcV architecture, with a 2,264-nt circular DNA molecule carrying a capsid gene on 1 strand and 2 genes on the opposite strand, which coded for Rep1 (involved in replication initiation) and Rep2 (involved in replication termination), respectively.
KU343137), another GcV, and HV-CV1 (GenBank accession no.
The between-assay and between-laboratory GCVs (8.4% and 28%) were similar to those for the potency of 96/668 calculated using the in-house reference preparations (6.9% and 28%).
New analysis from Frost & Sullivan, Analysis of the DoD Ground Combat Vehicle Market, finds that the GCV market generated revenues of over $3.67 billion in 2011 and estimates that revenues will decrease to $3.19 billion by 2017.
The variability within each laboratory (i.e., between the assays carried out by each laboratory), expressed by a percentage as a GCV, is given in Table 1.
TU Geminorum stays between magnitudes 7.2 and 8.5, and the GCVS lists its average period as roughly 230 days.
The GCVS lists it as having a visual magnitude range of 10.3 to 14.0 and a mean cycle length of 14 days.
Thirty-four variable stars have a range of at least 0.4 magnitude and become brighter than visual magnitude 4.0, according to the authoritative General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS) and its supplements the Name-lists of Variable Stars.
His analysis resulted in a period of 158 days, which was the basis for the value quoted in the GCVS. (4) Strangely enough Nikulina gave no magnitudes for maximum and minimum (in the paper he used values ranging from -1 to 17.6 which he called 'st', presumably for 'step value'), so the values for these (8.5-9.3) in the GCVS are taken straight from Schilt & Hill.
The continuous line is based on information in the General Catalogue of Variable Stars (GCVS), which lists the historical changes in R Hydrae's period by a series of linear approximations.
The development of a new Ground Combat Vehicle (GCV) to replaced the cancelled MGVs could also be subject to congressional debate and oversight.
clade 1 clade 2.2 clade 2.3 1 101 160 80 2 25 25 101 3 403 320 160 4 160 80 80 5 406 256 256 6 80 160 202 7 101 63 63 8 160 80 80 9 160 183 115 10 160 80 105 11 ([paragraph]) ND ND ND 12 403 160 202 13 80 32 25 14 160 127 25 15 101 63 63 Overall GMT 140 102 91 GCV, % 112 109 101 Assay tested and virus used (phylogenetic clade) Neutralization ([dagger]) NIBRG-14 ([double NIBRG-23 dagger]) ([double IBCDC-RG5 ([section]) dagger]) ([section]) Laboratory no.