output gap

(redirected from GDP gap)
Also found in: Financial, Wikipedia.

output gap

[′au̇t‚pu̇t ‚gap]
(electronics)
An interaction gap by means of which usable power can be abstracted from an electron stream in a microwave tube.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
At the end of 2018, the private-credit-to-non-oil GDP gap was -21 per cent.
The last time the country touched 5pc deficit in three quarters was in 2007-08 and the year finished at a 7.4pc of GDP gap between income and expenditure.
Abdygulov said that the continuing negative GDP gap coupled with a stable external inflation background determine a low inflation rate in the current year.
The slowdown in activity diminishes the GDP gap (difference between growth potential and current growth) and eases pressures on capacity constraints, wage growth and inflation.
With aggregate demand exceeding potential output by 1%, the country's "GDP gap" is now positive.
On the casualness of the paper, Bill had introduced a relation between what would now be called the GDP gap and the rate of change of prices into his earlier stabilisation models.
He emphasized the need for providing more autonomy to National Savings in order to minimize the Savings to GDP gap by utilizing technology-driven solutions to meet requirements of modern times.
Since the global economic crisis, advanced countries have stayed in a state of negative GDP gap, which means that the total demand is smaller than the potential supply volume, so their economic growth has slowed down.
Although most banks have considerably higher capital than global standard, a widening credit-to GDP gap combined with the fact that the credit-to-GDP ratio is high compared with peers indicates that the CCB would help mitigate vulnerabilities.
The typical measure of the opportunity costs of idle resources is the GDP gap. It is presented as
Comparisons of purchasing power are fraught with difficulties, but holding for purchasing power parity, the World Bank estimates that in 2012, China's GDP was $14.8 trillion, while the U.S.'s was $16.2 trillion--proportionally, a much smaller difference than the GDP gap calculated by using market exchange rates.