gastrointestinal tract

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gastrointestinal tract

[¦ga·strō‚in′tes·tən·əl ′trakt]
(anatomy)
The stomach and intestine.
References in periodicals archive ?
The collaboration aims to capitalise on the noteworthy recent progress towards understanding how GPCRs in the GI tract can be modulated.
The researchers -- including Jorge Munera, PhD, first author and postdoctoral fellow in the Wells laboratory -- note in their current paper the colon has been more difficult to generate than other parts of the GI tract.
Aside from these functions, the GI tract itself is an organ of the immune system.
Flora Renew, Daily Balance, Colon Comfort, Traveler's Support, Junior Daily Balance, Senior Daily Balance and Pet Balance were developed to support GI tract health and nurture the microbiome.
The majority of lymphomas are found in lymph nodes, but lymphomas can also be found in extranodal sites, including the GI tract (5 to 30 percent).
Pinealocytes, the major cell of the pineal gland, produce melatonin in the brain and enterochromaffin cells, which are scattered throughout the surface of the GI tract, produce melatonin in the gut.
The third edition contains seven brand new chapters, including information on autoimmune disorders of the GI tract, molecular diagnostics of tubal gut neoplasms and pancreas tissue processing techniques.
The organisms in your GI tract are sustained by the foods you eat, and some foods are better than others for maintaining balance.
They also exposed the cells to a protein called Noggin, which prevented the cells from differentiating into other cell types that live in the GI tract.
In particular, the GI tracts of autistic-like mice were "leaky," which means that they allow material to pass through the intestinal wall and into the bloodstream.
By inhibiting the synthesis of prostaglandins, the permeability of the GI tract is increased and the natural protective barrier of the mucosa is destroyed.
Clear cell sarcoma of the GI tract expresses S100 protein, but in contrast to its soft-tissue counterpart, it often does not stain with other melanocytic markers such as HMB-45 or melanoma-associated antigen recognized by T cells 1 (MART-1).