Grate

(redirected from GRAT)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Acronyms.
Related to GRAT: gratis

grate

[grāt]
(engineering)
A support for burning solid fuels; usually made of closely spaced bars to hold the burning fuel, while allowing combustion air to rise up to the fuel from beneath, and ashes to fall away from the burning fuel.

Grate

A frame that consists of parallel metal bars, attached by cross bars at regular intervals; used as a grille or security device.

grate

A surface with suitable openings to support a fuel bed, such as coal, and permit passage of air through the burning fuel. Designed to permit removal of unburned residue, and may be horizontal or inclined, stationary or movable.
References in periodicals archive ?
A shorter trust term also helps increase the odds that the GRAT will succeed in lowering overall taxes.
The combination of a PFLP and a GRAT will generally require a longer term to be used.
The short-term GRAT is, in sum, a very good deal-and, many now argue, too good to last.
6) The effectiveness of the GRAT as a wealth transferring device is dependent upon: (1) the grantor surviving the trust term (i.
First, a short-term GRAT minimizes exposure to the risk that the senior family member will die during the term, which, as stated above, would cause all or a portion of the value of the GRAT assets to be included in the senior family member's gross estate.
A GRAT, GRUT, or QPRT is effective where income producing property is located in more than one state and unification and probate savings are desired.
If the trust is set up as a GRAT or a GRUT only the remainder is subject to gift tax without regard to the remainderman's identity.
For many small business clients, a grantor retained annuity trust (GRAT) can form part of an effective planning strategy--allowing the client to capitalize both on the value of the GRAT strategy and today's family-business valuation discounts.
The first GRAT was set up so that the businessman would retain the right to receive an annuity for four years, after which the remaining trust assets, if any, would pass to the children's trust.
By using a rolling short-term GRAT, you can essentially keep your stock while transferring much of its growth in value to your beneficiaries.
Yet the GRAT has so far successfully resisted efforts to rein it in.