grid

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grid:

see electron tubeelectron tube,
device consisting of a sealed enclosure in which electrons flow between electrodes separated either by a vacuum (in a vacuum tube) or by an ionized gas at low pressure (in a gas tube).
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The Columbia Electronic Encyclopedia™ Copyright © 2013, Columbia University Press. Licensed from Columbia University Press. All rights reserved. www.cc.columbia.edu/cu/cup/

Grid

A framework of parallel, crisscrossed lines or bars forming a pattern of uniform size; sets of intersecting members on a square or triangular matrix, which make up a three-dimensional structural system.

power grid

A network of power transmission and distribution facilities used to provide electricity to users such as homes, businesses, and industry. Large power plants, wind-power-generating facilities, and small power producers such as photovoltaic farms feed electrical power into the grid for distribution to users.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

grid

[grid]
(computer science)
In optical character recognition, a system of two groups of parallel lines, perpendicular to each other, used to measure or specify character images.
(design engineering)
A network of equally spaced lines forming squares, used for determining permissible locations of holes on a printed circuit board or a chassis.
(electricity)
A metal plate with holes or ridges, used in a storage cell or battery as a conductor and a support for the active material.
Any systematic network, such as of telephone lines or power lines.
(electronics)
An electrode located between the cathode and anode of an electron tube, which has one or more openings through which electrons or ions can pass, and serves to control the flow of electrons from cathode to anode.
(mapping)
A system of uniformly spaced perpendicular lines and horizontal lines running north and south, and east and west on a map, chart, or aerial photograph; used in locating points.
(medicine)
(mining engineering)
Imaginary line used to divide the surface of an area when following a checkerboard placement of boreholes.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

grid

1. See gridiron.
2. See grillage.
3. In surveying, closely-spaced reference lines which are perpendicular to each other; elevations usually are taken at the intersections of these lines.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

grid

grid
A GEOREFF grid. This is superimposed on map.
i. The system of two sets of parallel lines uniformly spaced and crossing at 90° to each other to form a pattern of squares. This grid is designed so that any point on the map can be designated by its latitude and longitude or by its grid coordinates, and a reference in one system can be converted into a reference in another system. Such grids are usually identified by the name of the particular projection for which they are designated. See universal transverse Mercator's grid.
ii. The electrodes in an electron tube between the cathode and the anode that permit and direct the passage of electrons or ions.
iii. Two sets of mutually perpendicular lines dividing a map or chart into squares or rectangles to permit the location of any point by a system of rectangular coordinates as in a military grid, world geographic reference system, or GEOREFF. See GEOREFF.
iv. Pertaining to or measured from a reference grid, such as a grid azimuth, grid latitude, or grid meridian.
An Illustrated Dictionary of Aviation Copyright © 2005 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved

grid

1. a network of horizontal and vertical lines superimposed over a map, building plan, etc., for locating points
2. the grid the national network of transmission lines, pipes, etc., by which electricity, gas, or water is distributed
3. Electronics
a. an electrode situated between the cathode and anode of a valve usually consisting of a cylindrical mesh of wires, that controls the flow of electrons between cathode and anode
b. (as modifier): the grid bias
5. a plate in an accumulator that carries the active substance
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

grid

(1) Any interconnected set of nodes such as the electric power network or a communications network.

(2) "The Grid" is a nickname for Internet2. See Internet2.

(3) In a vacuum tube or gas-filled electron tube, the grid is a perforated electrode through which electrons may pass. The term typically refers to the control grid in a triode, tetrode or pentode vacuum tube. In these cases, the grid is used to control the amount of current flow between the cathode and plate (anode). As the voltage potential is varied on the control grid, the amount of current allowed to pass through also varies. Relatively small fluctuations in the grid's potential can control substantially larger amounts of current flow through the tube. This phenomenon is referred to as "gain." Tetrodes and pentodes use additional grids to regulate current flow and effect gain. See screen grid and suppressor grid.
Copyright © 1981-2019 by The Computer Language Company Inc. All Rights reserved. THIS DEFINITION IS FOR PERSONAL USE ONLY. All other reproduction is strictly prohibited without permission from the publisher.
References in periodicals archive ?
At present the total mini grid investment in countries with low levels of electricity access in Africa and Asia totals $5 billion.
Thermally-independent, compact HTS cables can be installed into existing rights of way, thus helping reduce the cost and environmental impact of future grid upgrades.
Going by many titles--on-demand computing, utility computing, grid computing--they all point to the same vision: a virtual pool of data center resources dynamically responsive to user demands.
The proof for triangular grids is also a constructive proof that begins with a cycle through two elements and inductively extends this cycle to the complete grid.
And grid is often used in discussions about next-generation data centre ideas like utility computing and organic IT.
The China Grid will simplify how students and researchers access education and computing resources across China.
Further extending its commitment to the open source development of grid computing tools and technologies, Sun also announced the contribution of the source code for the Jini(TM) network technology-based Jobs Applications Manager (JAM) prototype to the Grid Engine Project.
For example, no decrease was observed in a 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCI[D.sub.50]) of poliovirus samples after they were mounted on the grid and stained with 2.5 mM (1.6%) phosphotungstic acid, pH 7.0.
According to Mary Thomas, manager of the TACC Grid Computing Group, "It is crucial that grid technologies function in heterogeneous environments if they are to make the transition from theoretical ideas to real-world tools.
AVAKI Corporation offers the first commercial grid software solution to provide highly secure, wide-area access to processing, data and application resources in a single, uniform operating environment.
And thus they represent the ultimate unforming of the grid with which Bochner began--by their display of the physical means of the photograph.