GABA

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GABA

[′ga·bə or ‚jē‚ā‚bē′ā]
(organic chemistry)
γ-aminobutyric acid
References in periodicals archive ?
The accumulation of GABA increases with increase in soaking time.
Therefore, on water absorption, glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) is activated and glutamic acid is converted into GABA.
The growth increases after 40 hrs of aerobic cultivation, while the GABA amount of fermented rice remains low in level.
The GABA content in fermented rice increases with the progress in anaerobic cultivation.
The GABA content in fermented rice increase with decrease in oxygen concentrations.
Extract Extract yield (% Flavonoid content GABA content (% w/w of w/w of dry plant (% w/w of the the extract) material) extract) PAS 1 8.5 3.0% 3.8% PAS 4 24.0 30.6% 2.0% PAS 5 7.7 2.8% 2.1% PAS 7 9.8 46.4% 2.2% PASS 8.8 20.3% 2.9% Extract Dose of dry passiflora Anxiogenic effects Anticonvulsant herb equivalent to 1000 effects mg/kg/day of extract (g/kg/day) PAS 1 11.8 Medium Absent PAS 4 4.2 Low Present PAS 5 13.0 High Present PAS 7 10.2 Low Absent PASS 11.4 High Absent Discussion
In the present study of 5 extracts prepared from a single batch of Passiflora incarnata, we found that different extraction methods influenced the extract yield and total flavonoid and GABA content.
While many plant extracts contain amino acids, Passiflora extracts were found to have the highest GABA content of 21 examined plants (Carratu et al.
Since the natural flavonoids tested to date (hispidulin, apigenin, and quercetin) all seem to modulate [[alpha].sub.1] GABA receptors, they may be more effective as anticonvulsants than as anxiolytics.
This has been described in flavonoids such as apigenin (present in Passiflora incarnata), and means that GABA responses are only enhanced in the presence of a first order positive modulator such as diazepam.