Gabelle


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Gabelle

 

a tax on salt in medieval France; before the 14th century it was also a tax on cloth, wine, and other products. The gabelle was introduced by the state, which monopolized the sale of salt under the ordinance of 1341, and after being repealed twice, the tax was finally confirmed in 1383. Either officials or numerous tax farmers collected the gabelle. The tax rate was not uniform for all provinces: there were some with a large gabelle and some with a small one. In the 16th century the regions of Paris, Orleans, Tours, Dijon, Rouen, and others paid the large gabelle, and some provinces were released from paying the gabelle. From the second half of the 15th century the provinces of Poitou, Saintonge, Guyenne, and others did not pay the gabelle. In 1548, an insurrection broke out in Guyenne over an attempt to introduce the gabelle. The tax was particularly onerous in the coastal regions, which used much salt to preserve fish. The gabelle was one of the most hated taxes, causing popular unrest, for ex-ample in Auvillar in 1633 and in Agen in 1635. The gabelle was abolished in 1790.

REFERENCE

Duchat, E. La Gabelle, I’impot indirect. Troyes [1950].
References in periodicals archive ?
Although the Vatican records describe these loans as being per fare una casa, the gabelle of Siena do not point to the purchase of any property upon which the recipients actually might have built.
After the Revolution, the gabelle was removed but only to be reintroduced in the 19th century.
Scopo di questo articolo e analizzare la costruzione del meccanismi di esenzione degli ecclesiastici dalle gabelle nella citta di Napoli fra Cinque e Seicento.
O problema era que nem sempre era possivel equilibrar as tres demandas, o que explica, particularmente no seculo XVII, revoltas antifiscais contra os agentes de cobranca em que os revoltosos evocavam a protecao regia contra a cobranca de impostos, como no caso da revolta dos nus pieds (revolta dos descalcos), em 1639, em que se usou como lema para acao: vive le roi sans gabelle, ou seja, 'viva o rei sem o imposto sobre o sal' (BERCE, 1996).
A pesar del odioso recuerdo que habia dejado la gabelle, el impuesto sobre la sal duplico en 1813, alcanzando 40 francos por quintal.
VESTER, "The Political Autonomy of a Tax Farm: The Nice-Piedmont Gabelle of the Dukes of Savoy, 1525-1580", en The Journal of Modern History, no.
Coach Driver Scott Lupi Street kid, Little Lucie Brooke Greenberg Monsieur Defarge, Prosecutor, Tom Tom Richter Little Sydney Jacob Levine Gaspard Don Brewer Vengeance Carey Van Driest Gabelle Mischa Kischkum Joe, Weasel, Judge, President Jonathan Kline Stryver Frank Mastrone Aristocrat Danny Rothman Pianists: Gillian Berkowitz, John DiPinto With: Maria Couch, Carey Van Driest
Languedociens lived in a province of petite gabelle and thus had to buy 11 3/4 pounds of salt per capita at thirty-three livres ten sous the qui ntal, a cost of about five livres a head.
t-r-h"; Ira Lapidus, Muslim Cities, 56-57, 92-93, likens it to the early modern French practice of gabelle.
They were also called on to pay a rudimentary form of income tax, called the vingtieme -- payment of a twentieth of one's income, capitation (a head tax) and gabelle (a salt tax).
Historians disagree on causes of such an event as the French Revolution, emphasizing unrest in the cities, bad harvests in agriculture, taxation, and especially the gabelle, the heavy tax on salt.
Ibid,: "non avemo le piu vive intrate che le gabelle delle porte di Firenze.