Gabirol

Gabirol:

see Ibn Gabirol, Solomon ben JudahIbn Gabirol, Solomon ben Judah
, c.1021–1058, Jewish poet and philosopher, known also as Avicebron, b. Malaga. His secular poetry deals partly with nature and love, but most of it reveals a gloom and bitterness engendered by his tragic life.
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References in periodicals archive ?
I have elsewhere discussed how the great eleventh-century Hebrew poet Ibn Gabirol "yoked together by violence" the Biblical Personal Creator with creation by emanation in one metaphysical conceit--by exploiting incompatible figurative potentials of "shadow" (Tsur, On the Shore 295; Poetic Conventions 138-40).
The final chapter of the book is devoted to Jewish philosophy, notably that of Avicebron (Solomon ibn Gabirol) and Moses Maimonides.
In later periods, this distress appeared constantly in the writings of other masters of the Hebrew language, such as Shlomo ibn Gabirol. He was the sublime poet, perhaps the most excellent among the excellent, and without any doubt one of the maximum connoisseurs of the Hebrew language having a mastery of it without equal.
The Andalusian poet and philosopher Solomon ibn Gabirol supposedly created a golem maidservant to cook his meals and keep house for him.
It's a performance of a song called Shalom Lecha Dodi by Solomon ibn Gabirol, the 11th-century Jewish poet and philosopher from Cordoba, set to a tune by Muhammad Wahabi, an Algerian Muslim.
"Good manners will open doors that the best education cannot," said poet Solomon Ibn Gabirol.
Around 9:30 p.m., the main body of protesters split to two groups, with one group of some 300 leaving the crowd outside the Beit Ariela Library and making their way down Ibn Gabirol Street towards Rabin Square.
In this regard Hughes evidences the role that identity politics plays, sometimes retroactively in the cases of Shlomo ibn Gabirol and Judah Abravanel, in establishing one's place within the canon.