Gable

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gable

1. the triangular upper part of a wall between the sloping ends of a pitched roof (gable roof)
2. a triangular ornamental feature in the form of a gable, esp as used over a door or window
3. the triangular wall on both ends of a gambrel roof

Gable

(William) Clark. 1901--60, US film actor. His films include It Happened One Night (1934), San Francisco (1936), Gone with the Wind (1939), Mogambo (1953), and The Misfits (1960)
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Gable

The entire triangular end of a wall, above the level of the eaves, the top of which conforms to the slope of the roof which abuts against it, sometimes stepped and sometimes curved in a scroll shape.

bell gable

A gable-end parapet with an opening that supports a bell; it is found in Spanish Colonial architecture.

broken gable

A vertical surface at the end of a building having a broken-pitch roof; extending from the level of the cornice to the ridge of the roof.

crowstep gable

A masonry gable extended above the roof with a series of setbacks; often found in European medieval architecture, especially Dutch architecture.
Illustrated Dictionary of Architecture Copyright © 2012, 2002, 1998 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Gable

 

(Russian, shchipets), in architecture, the upper portion of (usually) an end wall of a building, bounded by the two slopes of the roof and not separated on the bottom by a cornice (unlike a pediment). The term is sometimes applied to structures with a steep, two-sided roof that forms a gable with an acute angle; such structures sometimes surmount the main facade of a building. The Russian term vimperg is also sometimes used to mean a gable.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

gable

[′gā·bəl]
(architecture)
The upper, triangular portion of the terminal wall of a building under the ridge of a sloped roof.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

gable

1. A vertical surface commonly situated at the end of a building, usually adjoining a pitched roof; its shape depends on the type of roof and parapet, although most often it is triangular; often extends from the level of the cornice up to the ridge of the roof. If the gable is on the façade rather than the back end, the building is said to be front-gabled.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Architecture and Construction. Copyright © 2003 by McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in classic literature ?
Thomas Lynde-- a meek little man whom Avonlea people called "Rachel Lynde's husband"--was sowing his late turnip seed on the hill field beyond the barn; and Matthew Cuthbert ought to have been sowing his on the big red brook field away over by Green Gables. Mrs.
On every side the seven gables pointed sharply towards the sky, and presented the aspect of a whole sisterhood of edifices, breathing through the spiracles of one great chimney.
The principal entrance, which had almost the breadth of a church-door, was in the angle between the two front gables, and was covered by an open porch, with benches beneath its shelter.
Accordingly, with such a tramp of his ponderous riding-boots as might of itself have been audible in the remotest of the seven gables, he advanced to the door, which the servant pointed out, and made its new panels reecho with a loud, free knock.
Thus early had that one guest,--the only guest who is certain, at one time or another, to find his way into every human dwelling, --thus early had Death stepped across the threshold of the House of the Seven Gables!
Now the Seven Gables will be new-shingled!" From father to son, they clung to the ancestral house with singular tenacity of home attachment.
We have already hinted that it is not our purpose to trace down the history of the Pyncheon family, in its unbroken connection with the House of the Seven Gables; nor to show, as in a magic picture, how the rustiness and infirmity of age gathered over the venerable house itself.
During the Revolution, the Pyncheon of that epoch, adopting the royal side, became a refugee; but repented, and made his reappearance, just at the point of time to preserve the House of the Seven Gables from confiscation.
It was the belief of those who knew him best, that he would positively have taken the very singular step of giving up the House of the Seven Gables to the representative of Matthew Maule, but for the unspeakable tumult which a suspicion of the old gentleman's project awakened among his Pyncheon relatives.
The only members of the family known to be extant were, first, the Judge himself, and a single surviving son, who was now travelling in Europe; next, the thirty years' prisoner, already alluded to, and a sister of the latter, who occupied, in an extremely retired manner, the House of the Seven Gables, in which she had a life-estate by the will of the old bachelor.
It was the next day that he failed for the first time to put flowers in the west gable. Instead, he cut a loose handful of daffodils and, looking furtively about him as if committing a crime, he laid them across the footpath under the pine.
When she heard the story of the west gable, which most people disbelieved, she believed it, although she did not understand it.