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Gaddi

(găd`ī), in the Bible, Manassite sent by Moses into Canaan.

Gaddi

(gäd`dē), celebrated family of Florentine artists. Gaddo Gaddi, c.1260–c.1333, painter and mosaicist, is said by Vasari to have been associated with Cimabue and Giotto. Among the mosaics attributed to him are those in the portico of Santa Maria Maggiore, Rome, and Coronation of the Virgin, over the portal in the Florence cathedral. His son, Taddeo Gaddi, c.1300–c.1366, was a favorite pupil and godson of Giotto, whom he assisted for 24 years. He became the leader of Florentine painting after his master's death. His works include the ceiling painting and a series of frescoes representing scenes from the life of the Virgin in the Baroncelli Chapel in Santa Croce, Florence; the fine Last Supper in the refectory of the same church; remains of frescoes in San Francesco, Pisa; altarpieces (Naples; Berlin; and the Uffizi); and Madonna with Saints (Santa Felicita, Florence). Taddeo's son, Agnolo Gaddi, c.1350–1396, a pupil of his father and of Giovanni di Milano, was also a follower of Giotto. His works are somewhat rigid in design and lack imagination. Among them are frescoes of the Story of the True Cross (Santa Croce, Florence); Life of the Virgin (cathedral, Prato); and four paintings in the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Gaddis's treatment of the Reith proposals also suffers from his America-centered research.
Although Gaddis notes that Kennan did not read Clausewitz's classic On War, he did profit greatly from reading one of the best essays on Clausewitz which appeared in Edward Mead Earle's Makers of Modern Strategy.
But though he was not yet close to Kennan, Gaddis had already launched a mini-revolution in the scholarly understanding of the Cold War.
As Gaddis writes, "Only Kennan had the credibility to show, at a time when too many Americans still viewed the Soviet Union as a wartime ally, that for reasons rooted in Russian history and Marxist-Leninist ideology, there could never be a normal peacetime relationship with it: Stalin's regime required external enemies." Kennan's genius lay in his parallel argument, that there was no need for despair, nor for appeasement, nor for war; the Soviet Union could be managed with "a long-term, patient but firm and vigilant containment of Russian expansive tendencies" until the regime toppled under the weight of its own inefficiencies and its deepening unpopularity in its Eastern European empire.
What these papers reveal, through Gaddis's scrupulous rendering, is a private, hypersensitive man plagued by anxieties and insecurities.
Gaddis previously worked as a finance and events coordinator for a U.S.
"Our focus here is to hurry up and get them to basic training," Gaddis said.
Gaddis's book presents an important argument about this vexed topic.
Gaddis, Lawrence Freedman of the Department of War Studies at King's College, London, and Vladislav Zubok read, criticized, approved every out-line, fine cut and final script of Cold War.
Gaddis discards the capitalization method as unsound for farm valuation, although he recommends it as a check.
Sleeping With Bad Boys lives up to its title and then some, offering lusty, sexy, between-the-sheets tell-alls about James Dean, Normain Mailer, Hugh Hefner, Philip Roth, and William Gaddis. Though sensual elements are definitely a highlight, Sleeping With Bad Boys isn't all sex, all the time; chapters also tell of the author's road to maturity, and pivotal events in her life, from private family emergencies to the assassination of JFK.
To begin with, the American historian John Lewis Gaddis has drawn upon his extensive previous writings to provide a general exploration of the Cold War for the benefit of those readers for whom the conflict's various crises and flashpoints were never 'current events'.