Gadsden Purchase


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Gadsden Purchase

(gădz`dən), strip of land purchased (1853) by the United States from Mexico. The Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo (1848) had described the U.S.-Mexico boundary vaguely, and President Pierce wanted to insure U.S. possession of the Mesilla Valley near the Rio Grande—the most practicable route for a southern railroad to the Pacific. James GadsdenGadsden, James
, 1788–1858, American railroad promoter and diplomat, b. Charleston, S.C.; grandson of Christopher Gadsden. He served in the War of 1812, under Andrew Jackson against the Seminole, and, later, as commissioner to remove the Seminole to their reservation in
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 negotiated the purchase, and the U.S. Senate ratified (1854) it by a narrow margin. The area of c.30,000 sq mi (77,700 sq km), purchased for $10 million, now forms extreme S New Mexico and Arizona S of the Gila.

Bibliography

See P. N. Garber, The Gadsden Treaty (1923, repr. 1959); O. B. Faulk, Too Far North, Too Far South (1967).

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Gadsden Purchase

an area of about 77 000 sq. km (30 000 sq. miles) in present-day Arizona and New Mexico, bought by the US from Mexico for 10 million dollars in 1853. The purchase was negotiated by James Gadsden (1788--1858), US diplomat
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
To add to the excitement, 2004 also marks the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Gadsden Purchase Treaty.
Of significant interest to mineral collectors will be a large number of fine displays of the minerals from the Gadsden Purchase Territory.
IT WAS THE GADSDEN Purchase that settled the main boundaries of the United States of America (though Alaska was added in 1867).
In the 40 years following our Second War for Independence in 1812, the size of the country doubled--adding Florida at the expense of Spain, Texas through its fight for independence, the Oregon Country from Britain, and the Mexican Cession and Gadsden Purchase as a result of the Mexican War.
In fact, from the period before Texas was brought into the Union to 1848, the United States added 1.2 million square miles to its dominion, and in 1853 filled out part of Arizona with a $10 million deal known as the Gadsden Purchase. The Mexican War had concluded with President Polk paying for title to the conquered land--a sum that was no more than he had offered before the conflict began.
The Gadsden Purchase, negotiated by James Gadsden, U.S.
The date the Gadsden Purchase was celebrated here-November 16, 1854 is blazoned on the town square's kiosk.
In 1853, the Gadsden Purchase passed the region from Mexican to American hands.