Gadshill

Gadshill

(gădz`hĭl), low hill, Kent, SE England, near Rochester. In Shakespeare's Henry IV it was the scene of Falstaff's robberies. Charles Dickens lived there, at Gadshill Place, from 1856 until his death in 1870.
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References in classic literature ?
Dickens lived during the greater part of his life in London, but in his later years near Rochester, at Gadshill, the scene of Falstaff's exploit.
But Falstaff's deepest mock follows the Gadshill robbery, the prank Poins and Hal plotted in their first scene.
What, ostler!" (2.1.1-3)--to the robbery on Gadshill, the subsequent return to the tavern, Hal's rehearsal of his later rejection of Falstaff, and the brief concluding exchange with the Sheriff; spliced into it is the development of Hotspur's plans at his castle in Northumberland for rebellion against Hal's father, Henry IV.
And his description of his fight at Gadshill is punctured by Poins by directing attention comically downwards:
Towards the end of the third act, just after the Gadshill incident, Falstaff remarks to his chief drinking companion:
Stonehouse, Catalogue of the library of Charles Dickens from Gadshill reprinted from Sotheran's 'Price current of literature' Nos.
My second example is generated by an atypical stage direction from a familiar script, / Henry IV, that sets up the re-robbing of Falstaff and his cronies at Gadshill: "As they are sharing the Prince and Poins set upon them, they all run away, and Falstaff after a blow or two runs away too, leaving the booty behind them" (2.2.101).
My second example is generated by an atypical stage direction from another familiar script, 1 Henry IV, that sets up the re-robbing of Falstaff and his cronies at Gadshill: "As they are sharing the Prince and Poins set upon them, they all run away, and Falstaff after a blow or two runs away too, leaving the booty behind them" (2.2.101).
Bain, of Gadshill Street, and Barrie, of Denmark Street, both Glasgow, have previous convictions for assault.
Dickens found some inspiration for the beginnings of the novel in the "desolate church" of Cooling, which lay, "out amongst the marshes seven miles from Gadshill" - which was where he died.
Mr Charles Dickens was on Wednesday, struck with paralysis, remained unconscious afterwards, and expired last night at quarter to six o'clock at his residence, Gadshill, near Rochester, Kent.
Having touched a comic nerve, Hazlitt again gets personal: "I have more sympathy with one of Shakespeare's pick-purses, Gadshill or Peto, than I can possibly have with any member of the Society for the Suppression of Vice, and would by no means assist to deliver the one into the hands of the other" (5:28, VI:33).