Gaelic


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Gaelic

(gā`lĭk), or Goidelic, group of languages belonging to the Celtic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. See Celtic languagesCeltic languages,
subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages. At one time, during the Hellenistic period, Celtic speech extended all the way from Britain and the Iberian Peninsula in the west across Europe to Asia Minor in the east, where a district still known as
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; Irish languageIrish language,
also called Irish Gaelic and Erse, member of the Goidelic group of the Celtic subfamily of the Indo-European family of languages (see Celtic languages). The history of Irish as a literary language falls into three periods: Old Irish (7th–9th cent. A.D.
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.

Gaelic

1. any of the closely related languages of the Celts in Ireland, Scotland, or (formerly) the Isle of Man
2. of, denoting, or relating to the Celtic people of Ireland, Scotland, or the Isle of Man or their language or customs

Gaelic

For automated test programs. Used in military, essentially replaced by ATLAS.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the nine years Boyd was principal, the college won international recognition for Gaelic research and scholarship.
Attendees will also learn about what's happening in Gaelic in Stirling.
October: The Gaelic for October is An Damhair, derived from damh-dair, which means "deer roaring time".
The first-ever Gaelic tourism strategy has been launched after previous research found that one in three visitors said the language had "enhanced" their experiences.
Singing Traditional Gaelic musicians took centre stage
Murray focuses in particular on the work of three authors, the Gaelic poets Donnchadh Ban Mac an t-Saoir (1724-1812) and Somhairle MacGill-Eain (1911-96) and the English-language novelist Neil M.
On the fringes of Europe, with a different (and misunderstood) culture, and political and social institutions, and also largely being a non-urban society, Celtic and Gaelic Ireland were attacked by Normans and Elizabethans.
Gaelic football does tend to attract a lot of players with an Irish background, but Ss Peter and Paul have a group here with a wide variety of cultures, and it's great to see them being so successful."
The Gaelic Athletic Association, which focuses on promoting Gaelic games and pastimes, was established in 1884.
Douglas Young is best-known in Gaelic circles as being the man who, at one stage almost single-handedly, encouraged and assisted in the publication of Sorley MacLean's Dain do Eimhir (1943).
While the Welsh and Gaelic languages do share an ancient common ancestor, they developed separately.
(4) The most significant such movement in the Irish context stemmed from an Irish-language organization known as the Gaelic League, which, at its height in the first decade of the twentieth century, had a membership of up to seventy-five thousand people in Ireland and abroad.